Tips for Buying Kids’ Shoes

When it comes to buying shoes for your children, there are so many different styles available; it can sometimes be difficult to figure out which one to choose. The most important thing to keep in mind is that your child needs proper foot support during childhood’s critical growth years.

A child’s foot can grow up to about the age of 18, and the most important development happens in the first seven years. Here is a quick look at how fast kids’ feet grow:

—  Under 12 months old, every 2 months.

—  12 months to 2.5 years old, every 3 months.

—  2.5 to 4 years old, every 4 months.

—  From 4 to 6 years old, every 6 months.

Shoes that do not fit properly can be uncomfortable and unhealthy. That is why it is important to always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes. Every shoe fits differently, so do not buy shoes based solely on the size printed on the shoebox. Make sure your child tries on every shoe and watch them as they walk to make sure they seem comfortable and fit properly.

Shoe Buying Tips When you find shoes that you like, hold them in your hand and examine them. The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), experts in foot health and development, recommends you look for the following features:

Flexibility. Typically, the younger the child, the thinner and more flexible the soles should be. The sole should be easily flexible and be able to bend in your hand without effort. It should bend with your child’s toes — where the ball of the foot will be rather than in the middle of the shoe.

Toe room. While your child is standing, you should be able to press about a half inch, roughly a finger’s width, between the longest toe and the front of the shoe. The area of the shoe just below the laces should crease when your baby takes a step.

Materials. The upper part of the shoe should be made of breathable materials such as leather, rather than synthetic materials. The insoles should be cushioned for comfort. Feel around inside the shoe for irregularities in stitching, glue or stapling. Look for a stiff heel cup. Press on both sides of the heel counter. It should not collapse.

To help parents find shoes that fit properly, here are some helpful shoe buying tips:

—  Make sure to see a professional trained in fitting shoes for infants,  toddlers and young

children

—  Have your child’s feet measured every 2 to 3 months until toddler  years, then every 3 to 4

months after that.

—  Feet are seldom precisely the same size. Always buy for the larger foot.

—  Do not buy shoes that need “breaking in.” Shoes should be comfortable from the

beginning. Observe your child walking around in both shoes for longer than a few

minutes. Then, check each foot to make certain there are no irritation marks.

—  Make sure the shoe is not too heavy. A heavy shoe can make your child walk irregularly,

preventing the development of a normal walking pattern.

—  If a child complains of foot pain or discomfort, schedule a check-up with you The

Podiatrist who specializes in children’s foot care.

Tips for Buying Kids’ Shoes

—  Shoes that do not fit properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet

before buying shoes and fit the shoe to the foot.

—  Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child  comfortably does not

mean it will fit another the same way. In  addition, the practice of sharing shoes can

spread fungi like athletes foot and nail fungus.

—  Watch for signs of irritation. Redness is a sure sign that a shoe is too tight or too loose. If

your child always wants to remove one or  both of his/her shoes, this may be an unspoken

sign that the shoes do not fit properly.

—  Examine the heels. When children begin to show in toeing, they may wear through the

heels of their shoes much quicker than outgrowing the shoes themselves. Uneven heel

wear can indicate a foot problem that  should be checked by The Podiatrist.

—  Shop for shoes later in the day. Feet tend to swell during the day, so take your children

shoe shopping when their feet are swollen, to ensure they’ll get the proper fit for all day

comfort.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

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About Your feet and podiatry with Caron Orelowitz | Registered Podiatrist - Auckland

Caron Orelowitz was born in Johannesburg and emigrated to New Zealand in 1997. She studied Podiatry at The Witwatersrand Technikon and was in private practice in South Africa for a few years, before setting off to ‘the other side of the world’. Auckland Podiatry. Since 1998 she has been helping people of all ages who have problems with their feet, from the elderly, to sports people, and those who just want some TLC for the feet. At present she has 5 practices (with a satellite Diabetes Practice out West Auckland), owns a children’s shoe shop (Scooters in Remuera), and tries to fit in some exercise when time permits. Caron is an active member of Podiatry New Zealand (NZ), and holds the position of Treasurer for the Auckland Branch, as well as representing the Northern Region on the Executive Council. She is registered under HPCAA (Health Practitioner Competency Assurance Act), and is often seen attending (and organizing) Seminars and workshops. Caron has a special interest in Paediatrics and can often be seen on the floor showing children some exercises. ACC registered Discounts for Super Gold Card Holders, members of Grey Power and Green Prescription participants. www.thepodiatrist.co.nz www.yourfeet.co.nz

Posted on May 28, 2012, in Contact a Podiatrist, What is a Podiatrist, Where to buy good childrens shoes?, Your feet and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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