Category Archives: Running Shoes

5 quick and easy tips to healthy feet and legs | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

one pair has to last a lifetime

There are many causes of leg pain right from muscle cramps and inflammation of tendons to arthritis, varicose veins and nerve damage. Leg pain due to muscle strain following an injury or wearing tight shoes for a long time can be prevented by following few simple tips:

  1. Stretch the leg muscle: One of the most effective ways to prevent leg pain due to a sudden muscle twist or cramp is to stretch the muscle. This not only improves blood flow to the injured muscle but it also helps in reducing muscle tension thereby relieving muscle soreness.
  2. Take a warm shower: If you suffer from leg pain, then take a warm shower to relax the muscles. If taking a bath is not feasible, then placing a heating pad on the affected areas can also help. A heat pack works best if the pain is due to a previous injury as it not only relaxes blood vessels but also improves blood circulation, alleviating leg pain.
  3. Wear a proper fitting athletic shoe: Most people fail to choose the right fitting shoe, which is one of the common causes of leg and heel pain. To get the right fit, determine the shape of your foot using the ‘wet test’. For this, step out of the shower onto a surface that will show your footprint, like a brown paper bag. If you have a flat foot, you will see an impression of your whole foot on the paper. If you have a high arch, you will only see the ball and heel of your foot. When shopping, look for athletic shoes that match your particular foot pattern.
  4. Choose the right sports shoe: Not many people are aware that different types of shoes are specially designed to meet your sports requirement. Did you know running long distances in court-style sneakers can contribute to shin splints? It is important to choose the shoes according to your sport or fitness routine.
  5. Go slow if you are a beginner at the gym: One of the common mistakes that most people commit is to overexert on the first day of the gym, which not only exerts pressure on the knee but also causes muscle soreness and leg pain. The key to preventing leg pain and sticking to your workout routine is to build your fitness level slowly. You can start off with less strenuous workouts and then gradually increase the duration, intensity, and frequency of your exercise regimen.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Advertisements

Shopping for School Shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

7787012-foot-measurement-device-that-using-for-checking-the-correct-size-of-your-shoe

 

  1. To avoid in-store arguments, parents and children should discuss in advance the style and brand of shoes they want to look for.
  1. Remember that a good fit is more important than the size of the footwear. A good fit allows for a 1/2” of space between the end of the toes and the end of shoe. Shop at retailers who provide a fit specialist for extra assistance.
  1. Avoid hand-me-down shoes; improperly fitted shoes can support feet in unhealthy positions.

4. Avoid shopping online or estimating a child’s shoe size.

  1. Remember that not all shoes of the same size fit alike. While foot measurement is a starting point, how the shoes fit is more important.
  1. Match the shape of the shoe to the shape of the foot.
  1. Remember that while a low arch is normal in young children, in children older than age seven, the lower the arch the more important it is to have shoes with good support. Look for a firm heel counter and stiffness when trying to twist shoes lengthwise.
  2. If a child wears orthotics, select shoes with removable foot beds and try the shoes on with the orthotics in place.
  1. Remember that price is not necessarily commensurate with quality. If price is a consideration, last year’s models can offer all the features needed at a discounted price.
  1. Check the fit on your child’s shoes on a regular basis as children’s feet grow at irregular rates.

For more information, or if you have any questions, contact The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

New York City Marathon | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

Good luck to all those running on Sunday.

Keep hydrated and warm and enjoy!

NYC-Marathon-logo

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Auckland Marathon 2015 | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

auckland marathon

Good Luck to all those running this weekend.

Drink plenty of fluids and enjoy the view.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Ready for the warmer weather? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

buying running shoes

With Spring upon us, and the weather becoming ideal for outdoor activities, many people are able to get outside and enjoy more of their activities such as walking or running.

People enjoy walking or running for a number of reasons. For many, it’s a simple form of exercise. For some, it’s about ‘the freedom of the road’ and ‘being one with nature’, while others find it an effective way to decrease stress.

Walking or running helps condition the body and improve blood circulation. Regular walking is associated with a healthier heart and a greater sense of well-being. For those who like to run, the right running technique combined with appropriate footwear helps minimize injuries.

If you plan on stepping outside to walk or run, here are a few things to consider:

  1. The right degree of flexion in your knees and elbows is important to reduce strain on your joints.
  2. Posture is important. In fact, your entire technique is dependent upon your posture for efficiency and safety.
  3. Having the appropriate range of motion helps minimize injuries and improve running technique.
  4. Maintaining symmetrical stride length is an important aspect of efficiency and injury prevention.
  5. Proper rhythm, or cadence, will help you to minimize injury by eliminating unnecessary overuse of your muscles.
  6. Coordination between your upper and lower body is an important aspect of running technique.

Each of these components plays a vital role in running technique. As you progress with each component, expect an improvement in your strength, efficiency, distance and possibly speed.

The best thing for you to do right now is to contact The Podiatrist and ask for an evaluation of your movement patterns before you start a walking or running program.

We can help you plan ahead. We can also create a rehabilitation program if you are currently experiencing any discomfort while walking or running. Your body deserves the right kind of care, and we can help you.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

9/11- Never Forget | The Podiatrist andyourfeetnz

firemen-9-11-never-forget

Which shoes? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

World Running day June 1. Helpful tips to help stay injury free

What Shoe Should I Wear for What Sport?

  • Basketball, tennis, and volleyball: Thick, stiff sole that gives support. Also, for basketball, look for high-top sneakers to support the ankle during quick changes in direction. For volleyball, consider a lighter shoe with less midsole support.
  • Football and lacrosse: With frequent sideways movements, good high ankle support is important. Also, traction on both wet and dry fields is important. Proper traction on shoes can help prevent injury.
  • Soccer: Shoes with good quality footbed to provide proper arch support are recommended. Also, consider using molded rubber cleats instead of the screw-on options.
  • Baseball/softball: Shoes with arch support are important for baseball. Consider using inserts called orthotics to help with arch pain. There should be no more than a half-inch of space between the big toe and the end of the shoe.
  • Running: A good shoe will give you maximum shock absorption. Don’t forget to match your shoe to your foot’s arch type and replace shoes after 300-500 miles!

Always remember, hand-me-down shoes and ill-fitting footwear can increase the danger of ankle injuries. Applying these tips to daily life will help insure you maintain the ability to walk comfortably for a long time!

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Achilles- a pain in the heel | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

achilles tendonitis can be painful

Wanting to get out there and do some exercise?

Hitting the courts and trails, eager to get moving.

Too many people, however, are failing to warm up first, and that is sending them to emergency rooms and The Podiatrist with painful, slow-to-heal Achilles tendon ruptures.

Located behind the ankle, the Achilles tendon connects the heel of the foot to the calf muscles and is responsible for the powerful push-off essential to running and many sports.

It is the largest and strongest tendon in the body.

A rupture occurs when the tendon tears, and that can happen because of repetitive damage, a sudden jump, or planting of the foot.

Symptoms can include a popping sensation in the heel or major heel pain.

Ruptures can take many months to heal.

Who’s most at risk? Not hotshot kids or professional athletes.

People in their middle ages are most susceptible, particularly men, around 45, who are weekend warriors.

In the winter, people are much less active, so the tendons tend to tighten. Like warming up your car in the morning, it is harder to get your body going. People tend to head out without stretching enough.

The most common sports associated with Achilles tendon ruptures were basketball, tennis, football, volleyball, and soccer. Most of the injuries happened at the amateur level, and 83 percent happened in men.

The Podiatrists’ prescription? Make stretching an all-day thing.

Many people mistakenly think they can just stretch right before heading out for a game or a run, but you need to do it three to four times a day, for about five to six minutes.

Here are two easy stretches:

Runner’s stretch against a wall: Step forward with your right foot and lower into a lunge. Place your hands against the wall, leaning forward. Switch sides.

Achilles stretch: Stand with one leg firmly on a step while the leg you are stretching hangs halfway off the step. Slowly lean back (without bouncing) onto your stretching leg, pushing the heel downward. Once you obtain a good stretch, maintain this position for 10 to 20 seconds. Stretch each leg independently.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Is Running Healthy? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

selecting the correct runinng shoes is important

The most common running injuries are due to overuse, over training, improper training shoes or a flaw in running form. The important thing is that most running injuries can be prevented.

Here are some of the most common injuries:

Runner’s knee: Runner’s knee is also called patella femoral syndrome and is a common ailment among run. This term is used to refer to a number of medical conditions that cause pain around the front of the knee.

Achilles tendinitis:   Achilles tendinitis is an injury that is the result of overuse and degeneration of the Achilles tendon. The  Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Achilles tendinitis often happens when runners suddenly increase the distance or intensity of their runs.

Plantar fasciitis: Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Plantar fascia is the band of tissue that connects your heel bone to toes. Inflammation of this tissue can be very painful resulting in stabbing pain in the heel especially in the morning.

Shin splints: Shin splints, clinically called medial tibial stress syndrome, is a common injury to runners or people who participate in activities with sudden stops and starts. Pain along the inner edge of the shinbone is an indication of shin splints.

Stress fracture: A stress fracture is an overuse injury. It occurs when muscles become fatigued and are unable to absorb added shock. Eventually, the fatigued muscle transfers the overload of stress to the bone causing a tiny crack called a stress fracture.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Does the shoe fit? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

To avoid foot pain and injuries, it is wise to change your running shoes often

Make sure your shoes fit.

 

Wearing comfortable shoes that fit can prevent many foot problems. Consider these tips for proper foot care:

Shoe size may change as you age. Always have your feet measured before buying shoes. The best time to measure your feet is at the end of the day when your feet are largest.

  • Most individuals have one foot that is larger than the other. Buy shoes to fit the larger foot.
  • Always try on shoes before purchasing. Shoe sizes can vary between brands and styles.
  • Walk in shoes before purchasing. The shoe heel should not slide when you walk.
  • Select shoes that are shaped like your foot. High heels and pointed toes can hurt your feet.
  • Leave about a half inch between your longest toe and the end of the shoe when standing.
  • Make sure the ball of your foot fits comfortably into the widest part of the shoe.
  • Don’t buy shoes that feel too tight and hope they will stretch.
  • The upper part of the shoes should be made of a soft, flexible material.
  • Soles should give solid footing with no slip.

Good foot care and regular foot checks are an important part of health care.

The Podiatrist should look at your feet often. If you have foot problems, make an appointment today.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz