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Sore Feet? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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Summer Foot Care Basics and Tips

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Ok so now that summer is officially in full swing (well kind of) it may be time to actually take some time to pamper those little puppies walking around in flip-flops and going bare in the sand.  Not only are your feet much more visible than they are in other seasons during the hot summer months, but they can also suffer more from increased walking and from less than supportive shoes.

This being the case, it might be a good time to think about giving your feet a little R and R.

Basic foot care involves some, well, basic tips. 

First of all it is important to wash your feet every day in order to insure that bacteria and fungus don’t get a chance to grow.  Even when you are not showering, you should take the time therefore to wash your feet.  This is even more important when walking around in flip flops or sporting bare feet on the beach because your feet will be exposed to a great deal more of these unpleasant germs. 

Always be sure to wash between the toes as well as over the foot itself. You also should avoid trimming or shaving off calluses no matter how tempting that little shaver at the pedicurists might be.  While your feet may be smoother than ever for a few days, thick layers of dry skin will grow back and you may be exposing yourself to a risk of infection.

Consult The Podiatrist if you are having trouble with stubborn corns and calluses.
Always wear shoes that fit properly. Walking around in tight fighting shoes will leave you at least hobbling. Because your feet swell and sweat in the heat, shoes without socks can become especially uncomfortable as your feet slip and rub against the shoe.  Make sure you have broken in your shoes before taking a long walk and make sure that they fit before buying them.  No matter how cute that little pair of ballet flats might be, if they don’t have your size then do let them go.

Tips on how to take care of our feet during these hot and sticky summer months.

It’s easy to forget that feet can get sunburned. Be sure to apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 50 when barefoot or if feet are exposed through open sandals, and don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet. 

With sandals and open shoe styles, feet are exposed to the elements. Dry, cracked heels are common during the summer months so make an effort to moisturize daily. The Gehwol Fussfraft foot care range have a balm for every skin type.

Keep Feet Clean: Foot perspiration is typical in the summer and can lead to fungal infection and unwanted odor. Wash feet daily, and let them dry thoroughly before putting shoes on. Also, consider using a foot powder to minimize odour. Why not try the Gehwol Herb Bath Salts, and use the Gehwol Fussfraft Mint balm- ideal for cooling the feet.

Add Cushion: When wearing high heels, your feet are feeling the pressure. Cushion the impact with an insole like Podsoft Foot Angles.

Sandals and jandals: with warmer weather, people tend to be more active and on their feet. To relieve tired, achy feet add extra support in your shoes. The Vasyli range of medical sandals are ideal for the summer.

Having perfectly manicured toes can make for a nice beach time public display but if you forget to follow these basic guidelines your feet will be more disaster than delight.  Remember always that your feet are important so to treat your them to a little basic pampering every day.

If you have any concerns, please feel free to contact us.

 

The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Get started on resolving your foot problem today.

Foot Pain Treatment: Podiatrist Talks Bunion Causes, Pain & Treatment The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

Bunions may progress in size and severity

Bunions are such an eye-sore! They can turn back the dial on even the hottest heels. But just what the heck are these things anyway?

Contrary to common belief, bunions are not a bone growth. Instead, a bunion is a progressive change of position of bones in the foot. Specifically, the bone commonly known as the bunion, is the 1st metatarsal. The first metatarsal moves away from the foot and is it changes, it pushes out the side of the foot where it appears as the “bunion bump”

As the 1st metatarsal moves one direction, the big toe moves in the other direction and leans towards the 2nd toe. These two bone changing position causes the 1st toe joint to be out of alignment and destabilizes the area leading to more progressive change and pain the joint.
Just how do bunions form?
The great majority of bunions are 90% genetic. The remaining 10% are caused by conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and similar disorders. The mechanics that are genetically inherited allow the bones to change position over time as described above.

Women are more genetically prone than men to get bunions 10:1. If one has genetic predisposition to get bunions, outside influences such as tight shoes and high heels may speed the progression. However, if one does not have genetic predisposition, tight and high heeled shoes will not cause a bunion.
Are there any potential treatments?

There are some effective preventive treatment for bunions. Bracing or splinting the toe, different shoe gear or arch supports/custom orthotics have shown to be beneficial in preventing the formation or progression of bunion deformity.

When bunions become painful, getting into wider and/or deeper shoes may provide symptomatic relief. Devices to protect the area may also provide relief but often make the shoe fit tighter, leading to more discomfort. When those alternatives are not effective, surgery is a consideration.

If you have any concerns, call The Podiatrist.

Get started on resolving your foot problem today.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Happy 4 July | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

happy 4 of july

Lest We Forget- | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

ANZAC day

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SOS guide to Happy Feet | The Podiatrist and your feetnz

 

 

When the weather gets hot, the shoes come off. Walking around in flip-flops, sandals or even barefoot can feel great, but it can also hurt the skin on your feet.

As we get ready for the summer , prepare to bare your soles with our SOS guide to putting your best foot forward.

Killer Heels
High heels force the weight of the body onto the ball of the foot, which can cause a build up of callus and bunions and an increased incidence of corns under the metatarsal. ‘Posture is affected as the body is thrown forward and the spine can become mis-aligned which can lead to a painful back, hip and knees. Repeated high heel wearers are also prone to shortening of the Achilles tendon making walking on flat surfaces without heels painful.

Top tip: Heels are fine if worn in moderation, but it should be remembered that pain is an indicator that something is wrong! Vary the style of shoe from day to day (platforms or wedges are better than stilettos despite the height of the heel). Gel insoles are also good for reducing pressure on the ball of the foot.

Flat Out
Flat shoes can pose as many risks as high heels. Wearing completely flat pumps puts the feet at risk from pain as there is no shock absorbency and little support. Another problem can be corms and calluses as pumps are often worn a size too small in order to keep them on the foot. Flip-flops don’t fare much better either. Research has shown that flip-flop wearers take shorter steps resulting in a higher risk of joint and muscle pain. Added to this, wearing flat shoes can stretch the calf muscles and Achilles tendon especially if used to wearing heels.

Lumps and bumps

Calluses: A callus is an area of toughened skin developed in response to repeated contact or pressure and is one of the most common foot problems. Generally pain-free (although they can produce a burning sensation), they can lead to more serious problems such as underlying tissue damage if left unchecked. Prevention is the best cure and wearing shoes that fit properly is the first port of call.

Corns: A corn is essentially the same thing as a callous only it is a more localized thickening of the skin which appears as a cone-shaped mass and is most commonly found on the toes. Seeking professional assessment from The Podiatrist is highly recommended.

Cracked Heels: More of a cosmetic problem than a serious concern, cracked heels often affect people who have naturally dry skin and is exacerbated by lifestyle factors such as standing for long periods of time.

Bunions: Tight fitting shoes are thought to be the cause of bunions in about 90 per cent of patients although they can be inherited. Most people experience them as a bump on the base of the big toe but as they develop the big toe begins to angle in towards the other toes. The solution? Be careful with shoe styles if you know that you are developing one but once developed surgery to realign the metatarsal is usually required.

Ingrowing Toenails: This is a painful condition that occurs when the nail starts to press into the fleshy art of the adjacent skin. It can easily become infected and needs professional podiatry treatment. Badly cut toenails and ill-fitting shoes are the most common causes.

See The Podiatrist for any foot care problems or advice.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Fungal Toe Nails- Onychomycosis

How did I get a fungal nail infection?

If toenails start to take on a white veneer or become yellowed and crumbly then this likely to be a fungal infection taking hold. Fungal infections take a long time to penetrate and affect the nail plate. Athlete’s foot can often be the start of the fungal infection affecting the toenails.

Is a fungal nail dangerous?

Fungal infections of the toenails are an unpleasant, common problem but are usually painless. Some skin conditions and medical problems manifest themselves by changing the appearance of your toenail to look like fungal infections. It is important to obtain a correct assessment and diagnosis. A scraping of the toenail can be taken by your podiatrist or doctor to identify the fungus.

How can I treat a fungal nail?

It is always best to seek treatment and advice early on. Once a fungal infection has been identified there are a variety of options available:

  • Toenail paints: The Podiatrist can thin down thickened toenails and make them easier to treat yourself at home with nail paints. Fungal nail paints are available from the pharmacy. Treatment can take a long time and has limited success. It takes a lot of perseverance.
  • Anti-fungal creams. Creams that contain anti-fungal agents can be used to treat fungus around the nails. This is usually a more effective treatment in the early stage when the fungus first starts to affect the toenails.
  • Oral medication. These are prescribed by a Medical Doctor. They are generally very effective. Once the course of treatment has been completed the toenail may take several months to improve in appearance as it takes approximately 12 months for a toenail to grow completely from base to tip. During the period when the nail is re-growing, using an anti-fungal cream is advised to prevent further infection.

What will happen if I don’t treat it?

The fungus can lead to thickened, discolored toenails and will slowly spread to other toenails. It also can act as a source of skin fungal infections like athlete’s foot.
It may also deform the shape of the nail and lead to an ingrown toenail

 

See The Podiatrist for all you foot problems

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Summer Foot Care Basics and Tips

Image

Ok so now that summer is officially in full swing (well kind of) it may be time to actually take some time to pamper those little puppies walking around in flip-flops and going bare in the sand.  Not only are your feet much more visible than they are in other seasons during the hot summer months, but they can also suffer more from increased walking and from less than supportive footwear.  This being the case, it might be a good time to think about giving your feet a little R and R.

Basic foot care involves some, well, basic tips.  First of all it is important to wash your feet every day in order to insure that bacteria and fungus don’t get a chance to grow.  Even when you are not showering, you should take the time therefore to wash your feet.  This is even more important when walking around in flip flops or sporting bare feet on the beach because your feet will be exposed to a great deal more of these unpleasant germs.  Always be sure to wash between the toes as well as over the foot itself.

You also should avoid trimming or shaving off calluses no matter how tempting that little shaver at the pedicurists might be.  While your feet may be smoother than ever for a few days, thick layers of dry skin will grow back and you may be exposing yourself to a risk of infection.  Consult a doctor if you are having trouble with stubborn corns and calluses.

Always wear shoes that fit properly.  Walking around in the heat of the sun in tight fighting shoes will leave you running, or at least hobbling. Because your feet swell and sweat in the heat, shoes without socks can become especially uncomfortable as your feet slip and rub against the shoe.  Make sure you have broken in your shoes before taking a long walk and make sure that they fit before buying them.  No matter how cute that little pair of ballet flats might be, if they don’t have your size then do let them go.

Tips on how to take care of our feet during these hot and sticky summer months.
           

Apply Sunscreen:

It’s easy to forget that feet can get sunburned. Be sure to apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 50 when barefoot or if feet are exposed through open sandals, and don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet. 

Moisturize:

With sandals and open shoe styles, feet are exposed to the elements. Dry, cracked heels are common during the summer months so make an effort to moisturize daily. The Gehwol Fussfraft foot care range have a balm for every skin type.

Keep Feet Clean:

Foot perspiration is typical in the summer and can lead to fungal infection and unwanted odor. Wash feet daily, and let them dry thoroughly before putting shoes on. Also, consider using a foot powder to minimize odour. Why not try the Gehwol Herb Bath Salts, and use the Gehwol Fussfraft Mint balm– ideal for cooling the feet.

Add Cushion:

When wearing high heels, your feet are feeling the pressure. Cushion the impact with an insole like Podsoft Foot Angles

 Sandals and jandals:

With warmer weather, people tend to be more active and on their feet. To relieve tired, achy feet add extra support in your shoes. The Vasyli range of medical sandals are ideal for the summer.

Having perfectly manicured toes can make for a nice beach time public display but if you forget to follow these basic guidelines your feet will be more disaster than delight.  Remember always that your feet are important so to treat your them to a little basic pampering every day.

If you have any concerns, please feel free to contact us.

 

The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Arches and Aches

Flatfoot often becomes a serious problem if neglected in the initial stages. Here’s how to identify the symptoms and apply the right corrective measures

Flatfoot or “fallen arches” is a medical condition that affects the arches of the human feet, causing them to fall flat. It occurs in about 20 per cent of the world’s population. “Flatfoot, or pes planus, as it is medically called, refers to the loss of the normal arch in either or both feet. In infants it is common for the baby fat between the foot bones to cause the foot arches to fall flat. At first, all babies’ feet look flat, because the arch hasn’t formed yet. Arches should form by the time your child is 3 years of age and develop by the time he or she is 7 or 10 years old.

Wear and tear

In a lot of cases flatfoot develops due to ill-treatment of the feet. Muscles wear out due to ageing, sports injuries, standing or walking for prolonged periods of time on high heels or in shoes without proper support.

Weight and age are big factors. There are multiple causes of flatfoot, including trauma or injury, inflammatory arthritis and chronic wear and tear, often augmented by an increase in weight and age. The main injury occurs to a tendon on the inside of the ankle called the ‘posterior tibial’ tendon that supports the arch. As this tendon tears or weakens, the arch collapses, the heel tilts and the foot turns out.

One of the signs of flat feet in children is when they begin to complain of pain in their calf muscles or feet. If parents notice their child walking oddly, on the outer edges of the feet, or limping during long walks with pain around the area of the foot, they should get it checked.

In severe cases of childhood flatfoot, a ‘knock knee’ deformity may develop. If the child complains of foot, heel or ankle pain, you should visit the specialist who will take foot X-rays in a standing position to check joints and feet bones.

Pain on the inside of the ankle or the arch or a decreased ability to walk or run due to aching feet is often the first sign of a flatfoot developing

It is not just the feet that hurt. Flatfoot affects other parts of the body too. Flat feet can affect the knees, hips and back. The arch collapsing inwards places stress on the knee, which may rotate the hip and cause back pain. Avoid high heels and flat shoes with no support, such as ballet flats and jandals.

Experts recommend that children run or walk barefoot on rugged terrain such as sand or rocks.

If the child has flatfoot symptoms, an arch support can be placed inside the shoe to correct it.

In case of severe collapse, additional arch support with an orthotic insert may be required.

If you have any questions, or feel that you need some expert advice, contact The Podiatrist.