Category Archives: Where to buy good childrens shoes?

Feet ready for summer? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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One perk of a beach-bound holiday is knowing that instead of closed in shoes with socks or stockings and having your feet feeling toasty in sweaty Uggs, you can lounge happily with your toes dangling in the warm weather, shoe-free with the sand at your feet. But alas, the dream does come with its own set of tootsie troubles. Even if you are just lying still on your back soaking up the rays, your feet are still vulnerable. You can seriously sunburn your feet and no matter how upscale your hotel, athlete’s foot can lurk in all public pool areas.

  1. Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete’s foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
  2. Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
  3. Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don’t forget to reapply after you’ve been in the water.
  4. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking water will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  5. Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.
  6. Some activities at the beach, lake, or river may require different types of footwear to be worn, so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
  7. If you injure your foot or ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from a podiatric physician. Many often only contact a doctor when something is broken or sprained, but a podiatrist can begin treating your ailment immediately while you’re away from home. Use our Find a Podiatrist tool to get treatment wherever your travels take you!
  8. In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go foot gear:
    • Flip flops—for the pool, spa, hotel room, and airport security check points
    • Sterile bandages—for covering minor cuts and scrapes
    • Antibiotic cream—to treat any skin injury
    • Emollient-enriched cream—to hydrate feet
    • Blister pads or moleskin—to protect against blisters
    • Motrin or Advil (anti-inflammatory)—to ease tired, swollen feet
    • Toenail clippers—to keep toenails trimmed
    • Emery board—to smooth rough edges or broken nails
    • Pumice stone—to soften callused skin
    • Sunscreen—to protect against the scorching sun
    • Aloe vera or Silvadene cream—to relieve sunburns

 

We have an extensive range of foot creams to help with those dry and cracked heels. Come and have a look.

For all your foot care needs- see The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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Shopping for School shoes- again|The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

measuring children's feet is important to ensure the perfect fit

The wrong school shoes could cause bunions, corns, calluses, blisters, clawed toes, heel pain or change the shape and function of a foot.

School shoes would be one of those things that one should consider spending a bit more money on as children spend up to 40 hours a week in them.

More expensive shoes are likely to last a lot longer than the cheaper ones.

Parents of children with flat feet should be particularly careful.

Runners could also provide support, as long as they were fitted properly, Ms Biedak said.

Ballet flats and skater shoes for everyday wear at school is not recommended.

GET IT RIGHT

You would be better off taking your child with you to get school shoes. Shoes need to fit properly. It is not a guessing game, and all makes fit differently. A size and fit in one make is not necessary the same size and fit in another.

TIPS FOR BUYING SCHOOL SHOES

– Measure BOTH feet, as most people will have one foot longer or wider than the other

– Look for soles made from rubber and double-stitching around the toe area, which will give shoes a longer life

– Avoid slip-on shoes

– Avoid second-hand shoes as the worn shoe will have moulded to the shape of the previous wearer and could cause problems for your child’s feet

– It’s best to buy shoes in the late afternoon as children’s feet often swell by the end of the day

– There should be a child’s thumb-width between the end of the shoe and the end of the longest toe

– The widest part of the foot should correspond with the widest part of the shoe

– The fastening mechanism should hold the heel firmly in the back of the shoe

– The sole should not twist

– The heel should be snug but comfortable and the back part of the shoe strong and stable

– Your child should be able to move their toes freely, the shoes shouldn’t hurt and there should be no bulges from the toes on either side of the shoe

THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR

– Children complaining of pain in the feet, heel, knee or legs

– Regular, unexplained tripping or falling

– Uneven shoe wear or one shoe that wears down before the other

– Skin or toenail irritation

 

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Shopping for School Shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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  1. To avoid in-store arguments, parents and children should discuss in advance the style and brand of shoes they want to look for.
  1. Remember that a good fit is more important than the size of the footwear. A good fit allows for a 1/2” of space between the end of the toes and the end of shoe. Shop at retailers who provide a fit specialist for extra assistance.
  1. Avoid hand-me-down shoes; improperly fitted shoes can support feet in unhealthy positions.

4. Avoid shopping online or estimating a child’s shoe size.

  1. Remember that not all shoes of the same size fit alike. While foot measurement is a starting point, how the shoes fit is more important.
  1. Match the shape of the shoe to the shape of the foot.
  1. Remember that while a low arch is normal in young children, in children older than age seven, the lower the arch the more important it is to have shoes with good support. Look for a firm heel counter and stiffness when trying to twist shoes lengthwise.
  2. If a child wears orthotics, select shoes with removable foot beds and try the shoes on with the orthotics in place.
  1. Remember that price is not necessarily commensurate with quality. If price is a consideration, last year’s models can offer all the features needed at a discounted price.
  1. Check the fit on your child’s shoes on a regular basis as children’s feet grow at irregular rates.

For more information, or if you have any questions, contact The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Sore Feet and shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

You don't need to suffer from sore feet

Have you got sore feet and don’t know what type of shoe is best for you? Here are tips to help you find the best shoes for sore feet. But first before we look into the shoes, it’s important to know more about what sore feet are.
What are sore feet?
This is a condition where individual’s feet get swollen and most often painful. There are those people who are affected by sore feet at any one time or the other.
The soreness and the associated pain prevents the affected person from walking properly, standing, dancing, running, or even carrying out other essential dairy activities.
Sometimes the pain is extreme causing much discomfort. It is important for you to pay attention to your feet because with such kind of extreme feet soreness, you might end up being grounded.
What causes sore feet?
The sore feet can signify that the person might be suffering from an underlying problem. Another cause of sore feet is a condition known as fasciitis. Overuse of your feet and wearing the wrong type and ill-fitting shoes will also cause feet sores.
Other causes are a new set of pair of shoes, sports injury, pregnancy, foot trauma, obesity, muscle strain and age. The soreness is usually located in the arch, the heel, the toes area, or the ball of the foot.
The affected part becomes sore, reddish, inflammation occurs, pain may also be felt in other areas like knees, back, hips, or ankles. All these will cause difficulties in walking and wearing of shoes.
However, sore feet should not prevent you from carrying out your daily activities. It should not be a hindrance to your enjoyment of life.
.How to overcome sore feet problem
You will require going to see The Podiatrist so that you can be examined and given the required treatment. But even as you go through your treatment, you will require choosing best shoes for sore feet.
Choosing the best shoes will definitely help you to alleviate much of the pain caused by the sore feet. The best shoes for sore feet ought to support the feet well. With well supported feet you will be able to walk more comfortably and reduce further injury to the affected parts.
Using the right shoes will aide your healing process and allow you to continue with your day to day activities. Good quality shoes are thus a must to have so as to be able to tackle this problem of sore feet.
Yes it is possible to carry out with your sporting activities even when you are suffering from sore feet. You can also be able to carry out other various strenuous activities such as running by simply making the right choice of your shoes.
Thin soles shoes will not be good for sore feet. This is because they give your feet shock as you walk or carry out your activities. Thick soled shoes are the ideal ones.
They mostly come with extra padding layers and air bubbles that help in absorbing the shock preventing it from harming your feet or reaching the affected areas.
There are many designs of comfortable shoes to choose from. When shopping for the best shoes for sore feet it is important to check the key features of the shoes type you want.
The most important will be the cushioning the shoe will offer. Light weight shoes will also be ideal but with a thick sole capable of absorbing any shock.
So, with the right kind of shoes, you will be able to prevent the sore feet problem and if you already have it, see The Podiatrist.

Contact The Podiatrist if you have any problems.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Foot Pain, How to lace up those shoes.

lacing your shoes can help prevent certain problemsYou can tell a lot about a person by the shoes they wear. Believe it, there is nothing better than a good pair of shoes. Runners know this better than most, here are some simple solutions that can alleviate foot and lower leg pain. Symptoms: People constantly complain about their shoes rubbing the tops of the feet, their toes.

You can tell a lot about a person by the shoes they wear.
Believe it, there is nothing better than a good pair of shoes. Runners know this better than most, here are some simple solutions that can alleviate foot and lower leg pain.
Symptoms:
People constantly complain about their shoes rubbing the tops of the feet, their toes feel too restricted, the shoe feels too tight on the top of your feet, or your heels slip up and down.
Solution:
Try lacing up your shoes with these alternate lacing methods to reduce the pain.
Most shoe laces have no elasticity to them. Identify where the pain is on your foot, and how it manifesting itself. Try these various shoe lace techniques to relieve pressure on the problem spot.
• If you have a wide foot, leave the first few eyelets unlaced.
• If you have a high instep (arch), skip all but the very few tip eyelets and lace up the sides with no crossover.
• If you have a narrow foot, double back through the extra loops in the mid foot for greater tightening.
Remember that foot size and type will largely determine how well your shoes will fit. If you continue to have trouble perhaps you need to consider other shoe options or perhaps you may have a more serious foot condition that necessitates consult The Podiatrist for an assessment.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Sever’s Disease: heel pain in children

Calcaneal-Apophysitis- heel pain in growing children

If you notice your child limping or changing their style of running, ask if their foot hurts. Your child may be suffering from a common condition called Sever’s Disease that affects growing adolescents.
Children are participating in sports and competing at higher levels at younger ages, therefore, the incidence of Sever’s disease continues to rise. Common symptoms of Sever’s Disease include heel pain with limping, especially after running, difficulty walking, discomfort or stiffness in the feet upon awaking and or swelling and redness in the heel.
Sever’s disease is the most common cause of foot pain in young, active children. Children who play basketball, soccer, baseball or gymnastics are commonly affected. Sometimes the initial symptoms are so mild that they can go unnoticed for weeks,especially if your child does not complain.
Sever’s disease often occurs in boys ages 9-15 and girls ages 8-13. Sever’s disease has a gradual onset and is typically triggered by a sudden and large growth spurt. During the growth spurt, the heel bone grows faster than the muscles in the calf and the Achilles tendon have the ability to lengthen. Therefore, the calf muscles and tendon become tighter. The pulling on the heel bone causes irritation that leads to an inflammatory response and Sever’s disease. Common symptoms are heel pain while walking or playing sports and tenderness along the back of the heel.
Sever’s disease is typically diagnosed based on information collected verbally and through a thorough examination by The Podiatrist.
Activities that require a lot of running and jumping increase forces through the heel bone and typically cause increase pain for children with Sever’s disease. Running and jumping on hard surfaces or in cleats may increase irritation levels. Standing on hard surfaces in cleats or participating in sports with poorly fitted or worn shoes also cause more severe symptoms. For example, a child that stands on the sidelines for extended periods of time during rugby or soccer games may complain of pain. It is important to protect children’s feet with proper fitting athletic shoes that should be replaced when the padding or heel starts to wear down.
Another risk factor for Sever’s disease is the position of the child’s foot when they walk or run. Pronation is a normal position of the foot that occurs when weight is transferred when walking and running. Excessive pronation can be a factor because it creates abnormal forces through the heel, which can lead to increase tightness of the Achilles tendon and create higher strain to the heel bone. Excessive pronation can occur when the arch of a child’s foot is excessively flat or high.
Childhood obesity is another risk factor for Sever’s disease because the excessive weight puts increased pressure on the heel bone. Sever’s disease rarely occurs in older adolescents because the growth plate of the heel bone stops growing around the age of 15. When the heel bone growth plate hardens, the bone becomes stronger which decreases a child’s risk for Sever’s disease.
The best way to treat Sever’s disease is to calm down the inflammation and correct the cause. Children must rest from the activity or sport causing the pain. They should not resume the activity causing pain until it can be performed pain-free. Other treatments include icing the painful area one to two times a day, gentle stretching of the muscles in the calf, and wearing properly fitted sneakers or shoes.
If your child complains of heel pain without a specific traumatic event try rest, ice, stretches and new shoes. The length of time for healing depends on the severity of the inflammation and treatment. If the pain persists, schedule an appointment with The Podiatrist. The Podiatrist will do an assessment to rule out other issues such as soft tissue tightness and trunk and leg weakness that can contribute to prolonged symptoms or recurrence of Sever’s disease.
If you feel you child may be suffering from Sever’s disease, book an appointment today
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz
http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

Christmas gift ideas

Well, it is that time of the year and we are all rushing around.
Here are some great gift ideas for those who are hard to buy for.

VASYLI JANDALS
vasyli orthotic sandals for sore and tired feet

GEHWOL FOOTCARE CREAMS
gehwol

TEVA SANDALS FOR KIDS
Teva Dozer- ideal for those children who wear orthoses

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.
We will be back in January.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz
http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

YourFeetNZ- The Podiatrist |Tips for purchasing footwear for school

You remember preparing for your first day of school; the shopping, in particular shoe shopping, and the wonder of a pair of brand new sneakers, shoes or even sandals.  Somehow, the experience is very different when, as a parent, you have to be concerned about size and budget, instead of style and colour as your child!

Since parents tend to take advantage of back to school sales, health experts advise that you have to be careful about which shoes and school bags are bought. Shopping for new school shoes is a chore that parents everywhere share, as they prepare their children for school for the first time, or on their return from holidays

Children spend around 30-45 hours a week in their school shoes, or more than 15,000 hours during their school years, so it’s vital that they’re fitted properly. In the first 11 years of a child’s life, feet may grow through approximately 17 shoe sizes, up until they’re 18 years of age. Ill-fitting shoes can lead to problems in adulthood, such as ingrown toenails, corns and bunions, which may even require surgery later in life.

Important Purchasing Advice

• Always have your child’s feet measured before you buy shoes. Children’s feet grow quickly, so you shouldn’t rely on a previous measurement.

• Opt for new shoes, once financially possible, instead of accepting hand-me-downs. That will help ensure a better fit and avoid spreading germs, such as the fungus that causes athlete’s foot.

• Inspect the heels of your child’s shoes for uneven wear, which may indicate a foot problem.

• Don’t buy shoes that aren’t comfortable. There should be no reason to “break in” a new pair of shoes.

It’s no surprise that kids want to be like other kids and wear what their friends are wearing. Even in pre-school, style is important. Still, from mom and dad’s point of view, there is more to shoes than looking good.

These tips will explain why:

• Shoes need to be flexible and able to sustain extreme activity. They should also provide support and cushioning and be breathable, to allow body heat and moisture to escape.

• However, a bad fit can negate all the benefits of a good shoe, so finding the right size is essential. Since shoe sizes tend to vary by manufacturer, an accurate fit can only be assured once the foot is inside the shoe.

• A tip for making sure that the shoe size fits, is measuring the distance between the second toe and the end of the shoe. The second toe is usually the longest.

• Have your child walk around in the shoes to make sure that they don’t hit the ankle bones or have seams that rub against the foot.

• Though it may seem children quickly outgrow their shoes, buying shoes that are too big isn’t a good idea. A loose fit can cause painful calluses and sores, because there is too much movement in the shoe. On the other hand, shoes that are too small can cause an abnormal gait that can misalign growing bones in the feet.

It may be time to get a new pair of shoes if your child begins to complain about shoes that are uncomfortable; be aware, however, that trend conscious youngsters have been known to “need” new shoes because of what the others kids are wearing. Shoes can put a dent in any household budget, so make sure that the shoes fit when you buy them, and before you buy a bigger pair of shoes.

Buy shoes at the end of the day

While you might decide to head out bright and early to get your child’s shoes fitted, bear in mind that it’s best to go during late afternoon. This is because children’s feet often get a little more swollen by the end of the day. That way, you’ll get school shoes fitted when your child’s feet are at their biggest.

Other things to look out for

While you might usually expect to only think about school shoes and your kids’ feet once a year, here’s a checklist of things to look out for, and see a podiatrist/foot health practitioner if necessary:

• Children complaining of pain in the feet, heel, knees or legs

• Unexplained tripping and falling (if it happens regularly)

• Uneven shoe wear, or one shoe that wears down before the other

• Skin or toenail irritation.

Do share this information with your kids who are old enough to appreciate the advice to minimise peer pressure, and ultimately your stress levels … Happy shopping!

Your feet mirror your general health… cherish them!

There is a great range of summer sandals ideal for school and casual wear available from Scooters.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.scooters.net.nz

Shoes that make the grade

Children’s feet change with age. Shoe and sock sizes may change every few months as a child’s feet grow.

  • Shoes that don’t fit properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes, and watch for signs of irritation.
  • Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn’t mean it will fit another the same way. Also, sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete’s foot and nail fungus.
  • Examine the heels. Children may wear through the heels of shoes quicker than outgrowing shoes themselves. Uneven heel wear can indicate a foot problem that should be checked by a podiatrist.
  • Take your child shoe shopping. Every shoe fits differently. Letting a child have a say in the shoe buying process promotes healthy foot habits down the road.
  • Always buy for the larger foot. Feet are seldom precisely the same size.
  • Buy shoes that do not need a “break-in” period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. Also make sure to have your child try on shoes with socks or tights, if that’s how they’ll be worn.
  • Consider closed toe shoes. Covering the child’s toes allows for more protection.

Do Your Child’s Shoes “Make The Grade?”

  • Look for a stiff heel. Press on both sides of the heel counter. It shouldn’t collapse.
  • Check toe flexibility. The shoe should bend with your child’s toes. It shouldn’t be too stiff or bend too much in the toe box area.
  • Select a shoe with a rigid middle. Does your shoe twist? Your shoe should never twist in the middle.
  • Are the shoes secure on the foot? Laces or Velcro are best to hold the foot in place.

Additional Advice for Parents

  • Foot problems noticed at birth will not disappear by themselves. Do not wait until children get older to fix a problem. Foot problems in youths can lead to create problems down the road.
  • Get your child checked by The Podiatrist. A lack of complaint by a youngster is not a reliable sign that there is no problem. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.
  • Walking is the best of all foot exercises. Observe your child’s walking patterns. Does your child have gait abnormalities? Correct the problem before it becomes a bigger issue.
  • Going barefoot is a healthy activity for children under the right conditions. However, walking barefoot on dirty pavement can expose children’s feet to the dangers of infection through accidental cuts and to severe contusions, sprains or fractures. Plantar warts, a virus on the sole of the foot, can also be contracted.

Children’s sports-related injuries are on the rise. A child’s visit to The Podiatrist can help determine any concerns there may be regarding the child participating in specific sports and help identify the activities that may be best suited for the individual child.

Visit The Podiatrist for any concerns you may have.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

Children and Orthotics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children and Orthotics

Children with foot problems are brought in to the office by their parents to see Kidsnmotion Podiatrists. Many times their complaints include their children are not running or participating in activities. Sometimes children complain of aches and pains, even after taking a couple steps of walking. The Podiatrist is able to evaluate children and see how they are walking. In most instances we can see what the problem is through an evaluation, but there are times when he will need to perform x-rays, and other testing, to get to the root of the issue.

Sometimes with the proper shoes, or the proper orthotic inserts, exercises, issues with walking can improve tremendously. Orthotics can help correct your child’s abnormal foot position and eliminate pain that comes with walking.

Conditions Treated with Pediatric Orthotics Include:

  • Flatfoot – can cause awkward gait, cramping and pain in your child’s foot.
  • Sever’s Disease – can cause your child’s heel to become inflamed, swelling, pain and stiffness.
  • Metatarsus Adductus – happens when the front of your child’s foot points inward while the heel remains in its natural position. It often happens in infants from their feet being bent while in the womb.

How Orthotics Can Help Children

Orthotics for children can help with the treatment of foot deformities. It’s important for a child’s feet to be checked as soon as an issue arises. If there is a need for orthotics then they should be fitted for your child after they start waking. Having orthotics will help stabilize your child’s foot. An orthotic for children can be inserted into your child’s shoe, and will more than likely need to be replaced as the foot grows. As for how long a child will need to wear an orthotic depends on the seriousness of the condition.

Other ways orthotics can help children, they include:

  • Helps reduce pain and cramping in your child’s knees, feet or legs.
  • Can eliminate the need for bracing or corrective surgery.
  • Helps reduce heel pain and prevent limping.
  • Helps improve your child’s gait or stride.
  • Sports activity will be easier for your child as they won’t have to deal with pain or cramps.

Next Steps

If your child is complaining of foot pain, or pain while performing activities, set-up an appointment with The Podiatrist at Kidsnmotion. We will give your child a thorough examination and will help identify the cause of the pain.

For more advice and footcare tips visit us today.

www.kidsnmotion.co,nz

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.scooters.net.nz