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Southern Cross Easy-Claims| The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

southern-cross-easy-claim

Easy-claim

Southern Cross Health Society Easy-claim (“Easy-claim”) is a convenient way for Southern Cross members to claim for eligible healthcare services at the time of purchase, without completing a claim form.

How to use Easy-claim

You can use Easy-claim at The Podiatrist. Simply present your Member card or your app at the counter when you are purchasing eligible healthcare products and services.

If your plan covers the product or service and it qualifies, we’ll reimburse the provider directly and you’ll only pay any remaining contribution you’re responsible for, so you don’t have to worry about filling out claim forms or waiting for a refund.*

For all your foot problems- call The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Tel: (09) 550 6325

 

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5 quick and easy tips to healthy feet and legs | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

one pair has to last a lifetime

There are many causes of leg pain right from muscle cramps and inflammation of tendons to arthritis, varicose veins and nerve damage. Leg pain due to muscle strain following an injury or wearing tight shoes for a long time can be prevented by following few simple tips:

  1. Stretch the leg muscle: One of the most effective ways to prevent leg pain due to a sudden muscle twist or cramp is to stretch the muscle. This not only improves blood flow to the injured muscle but it also helps in reducing muscle tension thereby relieving muscle soreness.
  2. Take a warm shower: If you suffer from leg pain, then take a warm shower to relax the muscles. If taking a bath is not feasible, then placing a heating pad on the affected areas can also help. A heat pack works best if the pain is due to a previous injury as it not only relaxes blood vessels but also improves blood circulation, alleviating leg pain.
  3. Wear a proper fitting athletic shoe: Most people fail to choose the right fitting shoe, which is one of the common causes of leg and heel pain. To get the right fit, determine the shape of your foot using the ‘wet test’. For this, step out of the shower onto a surface that will show your footprint, like a brown paper bag. If you have a flat foot, you will see an impression of your whole foot on the paper. If you have a high arch, you will only see the ball and heel of your foot. When shopping, look for athletic shoes that match your particular foot pattern.
  4. Choose the right sports shoe: Not many people are aware that different types of shoes are specially designed to meet your sports requirement. Did you know running long distances in court-style sneakers can contribute to shin splints? It is important to choose the shoes according to your sport or fitness routine.
  5. Go slow if you are a beginner at the gym: One of the common mistakes that most people commit is to overexert on the first day of the gym, which not only exerts pressure on the knee but also causes muscle soreness and leg pain. The key to preventing leg pain and sticking to your workout routine is to build your fitness level slowly. You can start off with less strenuous workouts and then gradually increase the duration, intensity, and frequency of your exercise regimen.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Agony of ‘de-feet’ or how to prevent ingrown toenails | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

ingrown toenail

You know we expect an awful lot from our feet. We walk, run and jump on them. We cram them into socks and shoes. We use them to stand a little taller. We subject them to sand, rocks and heaven knows what hazards they endure while walking barefoot in our homes. Then we complain bitterly when they hurt. Makes sense to me.

Want to talk about foot pain? Talk about an ingrown toenail. Also known as onychocryptosis or unguis incarnatus (I dare you to pronounce those words) an ingrown toenail occurs when a sharp corner of the toenail digs into the skin at the end or side of the toe. Although it can happen to any toe, it’s most likely to be your big toe.

An ingrown toenail can be the result of trauma, such as stubbing your toe, having an object fall on your toe, or engaging in activities that involve repeated pressure on the toes, such as kicking or running.

The most common cause of ingrown toenails is incorrect trimming. Cutting your nails too short encourages the skin next to the nail to fold over the nail. Another cause of ingrown toenails is wearing shoes that are tight or short. Certain nail conditions are often associated with ingrown toenails. For example, if you have had a toenail fungal infection or if you have lost a nail through trauma, you are at greater risk for developing an ingrown toenail.

Treatment of Ingrown Toenails

Home care:

If you don’t have an infection or any medical conditions that may affect your healing, you can soak your foot in room-temperature water with Epsom salts, and gently massage the side of the nail fold to help irrigate the area.
Avoid attempting “bathroom surgery.” Repeated cutting of the nail can cause the condition to worsen over time. If your symptoms fail to improve, make an appointment with The Podiatrist.

Home treatment is strongly discouraged if you suspect you have an infection, or if you have a medical condition that puts your feet at high risk, for example diabetes, nerve damage in the foot, or poor circulation.

Preventing Ingrown Toenails

Many cases of ingrown toenails may be prevented by following these two important tips:
•Trim your nails properly. Cut your toenails in a fairly straight line, and don’t cut them too short. You should be able to get your fingernail under the sides and end of the nail.
•Avoid poorly-fitting shoes. Don’t wear shoes that are short or tight in the toe box. Also avoid shoes that are loose, because they too cause pressure on the toes, especially when you run or walk briskly.

Myth Busting – Ingrown Toenails!

Myth: Cutting a “V” in the nail will reduce the tendency for the nail to curve downward.
Truth: Cutting a “V” does not affect the growth of the toenail. New nail growth occurs from the nail bed and will continue to grow in whatever shape the nail bed is in.

Myth: Repeated trimming of the nail borders is a good way to treat ingrown toenails.
Truth: Repeated nail trimming fails to correct future nail growth and can make the condition worse.

Myth: Cotton placed under the nail will relieve the pain.
Truth: Cotton placed under the nail can be harmful. It can easily harbour bacteria and encourage infection.

Myth: You can buy effective ingrown toenail treatments at the Pharmacy or Chemist.
Truth: Over-the-counter topical medications may mask the pain, but they fail to address the underlying problem.

Get started on resolving your foot problem today.
Visit The Podiatrist for all your foot care needs

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

A Holiday Survival Guide For Strappy Sandals Lovers- Foot care solutions to get you through the season in style

Dr Scholls toe protectors are great to wear

It has been reported that 87% of women have foot problems from wearing painfully ill-fitting shoes, it is time for some serious thinking about foot care and what can you do to preserve those tender tootsies while still partying like its 1999 in strappy sandals this holiday season.

Foot care is extremely important, and it often gets forgotten. Going to the salon to get a pedicure isn’t enough—regular maintenance is key, and should be part of your routine. Keep foot care products such as the Gehwol Creams and a pumice in the shower year-round so that it’s not a huge undertaking. Spend 30 seconds on each foot at least twice a week.

This is a program to help relax the foot muscles, prevent ugly blisters, and lessen the likelihood of bunions.
For starters, a good ‘ole foot soak with Gehwol Herbal Bath Salts relieves weary foot pain and swelling, and moisturizes as you soak the feet. Peppermint is often regarded as ‘the world’s oldest medicine, known for its relaxing, cooling effects on the body and mind. The Gehwol Mint cream is ideal for aching feet.

For daytime moisturizing, I use the Gehwol Blue or Green, or even the Balm creams. To prevent blisters, corns and burning pains over the balls of your feet, try some Dr Scholl’s toe protectors, or Foot Angel pads.

For an overnight emollient, you need a slightly thicker, lusher cream. The Gewhol Hydrolipid or Cracked Skin Salve.
Within days of caring for your feet, you will be strutting around with no pains at all.

gehwol

For any problems, see The Podiatrist- for all your foot care needs.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Pain in the ball of the foot- The Podiatrist | YourFeetNZ

forefoot pain

Pain at the ball of the foot, or the forefoot, is a common complaint in athletes. The forefoot is the part of the foot in front of the ankle consisting of groups of bones that include the metatarsals (five long bones in the forefoot) and phalanges (the bones that make up the toes). There are many medical issues that can arise in this region due to trauma, overuse, or other factors. Forefoot pain can range from mild pain causing a slight limp to severe pain that prevents walking. Common causes include: stress fracture, interdigital neuroma (also known as Morton neuroma), and sesamoiditis.
Stress fractures
A stress fracture is one of the more concerning potential causes of your discomfort. Metatarsal stress fractures result from repetitive stress to the forefoot, usually from running, jumping, dancing, and other repetitive weight-bearing activities. Patients with stress fractures of the metatarsal shaft describe a history of gradually worsening pain in the forefoot. Initially the pain is intermittent and occurs only with use. The patient may present with poorly defined forefoot pain or point tenderness over a metatarsal shaft. If the causative activity continues, the injury can progress, with swelling, severe pain even with normal activities, and frank fracture.
Diagnosis is made using history, physical exam, and potentially imaging studies. They usually respond well to cessation of the causative activity. Crutches and partial weight-bearing for several weeks may be helpful in patients who have pain with walking. A short-leg cast and non-weight-bearing may be used for short periods of time in patients with severe pain.
Interdigital neuroma
Interdigital neuromas are thought to be due to swelling and scar tissue formation on the small interdigital nerves. They most commonly involve the third webspace, but may also be seen in the second and fourth. Symptoms associated with a neuroma may include sharp or shooting pain, numbness, or pins and needle sensation. Many patients describe it as feeling like something is wadded up under the toes. It frequently can be temporarily relieved by removing the shoes and massaging the area.
Neuromas can be caused by trauma or chronic irritation. Chronic irritation can be in the form of wearing shoes that are not wide enough in the forefoot area causing compression of nerve. The irritation may also occur from abnormal mechanics of the foot causing excess motion of the metatarsal bones.
Diagnosis can be made by using elements of the history and physical exam, or by imaging studies such as ultrasound or MRI. Conservative treatment may include use of properly fit shoes (well cushioned with wide forefoot), metatarsal foot pads (to evenly distribute pressure to the metatarsal heads), and physical therapy (to address mechanics and strengthen the intrinsic muscles of the foot). If conservative treatment fails, injection therapy and surgery are also considerations.
Inflammation
Inflammation or injury of the sesamoid bones located on the plantar surface of the big toe joint can also cause pain in athletes. The sesamoids are pea-sized bones that function as pulleys for tendons (just as the patella does for the knee extensors) and assist with weightbearing. The athlete with sesamoiditis typically complains of pain at the area of the big toe joint with weightbearing that is exacerbated by walking, and even more so by running. Exquisite tenderness of the sesamoids is present, and is exacerbated by pushing off with the great toe. Imaging may be required to differentiate between sesamoiditis and a stress fracture. Both may require a short period of immobilization followed by prolonged rest from weightbearing activity. Athletes can use alternative, nonweightbearing forms of exercise to maintain fitness. Treatment with custom orthotics, soft pads cut to relieve pressure on the sesamoids, and in severe cases, glucocorticoid injections may be helpful. Consultation with a foot surgeon is reasonable in persistent cases.
These are just a few of the potential causes of your pain, however there are many other potential causes of forefoot pain. Discussion with The Podiatrist is advised. A specific diagnosis can then be made, after a full history and physical is performed. Appropriate treatment can also then be discussed.

See The Podiatrist for all your foot problems.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Caring for tired, aching feet

 

All of us have experienced tired and aching feet at one point or another, especially after long periods of dancing, shopping, walking or standing. As we age, the incidence of tired and aching feet become much more frequent and prolonged. Research has shown that fallen foot arches, or what is described in podiatric terms as over-pronated flat feet, causes a person to use more energy when walking, resulting in greater fatigue at the end of a day than people with normal feet. Strenuous walking or standing for long periods has an obvious effect on your feet. Other factors include ill fitting, poorly padded shoes, tight socks or stockings and tight garters. Reduced blood circulation to the ankles and feet also causes tired aching feet.

 

Contributing factors to tired and aching feet

There are multiple factors that contribute to the development of tired and aching feet:

• Age: as we age, the natural thick pad on the soles of our feet begin to thin. Additionally, our feet widen and flatten, and the skin on our feet also becomes drier. In some cases, foot pain in older people may be the first sign of arthritis, diabetes, and circulatory disease.

• Gender: Women are at higher risk than men for severe foot pain, especially women who wear high-heeled shoes. As a result, severe foot pain is a major cause of general disability in older women. Pregnant women have an increased risk of aching feet due to weight gain, swelling in their feet and ankles, and the release of certain hormones that cause ligaments to relax.

• Dehydration: your feet have approximately 250,000 sweat glands, and can excrete as much as a quarter of a litre of moisture each day. Therefore, it is important to remember to drink plenty of water, throughout the day.

 

Treatment and relief for tired, aching feet

• Lie on the floor and put your feet up on a couch or bed for about 15-20 minutes. This is a way of clearing the lymph modes and the water retention, which is a fairly common and very likely cause for aching feet.

• Soak your feet in Tea Tree Oil in warm water either in a basin or you can use a foot spa if you have one. Peppermint oil is good for the feet and has a soothing affect. Or use a good foot cream to relax your feet.

• Wear orthotic insoles in your shoes. Orthotics control over-pronation and support your arches, taking away one of the major causes of tired, aching feet!

• Have your feet massaged regularly

• Exercising your feet can help to keep them healthy. It tones your muscles, helps to strengthen the arches, and stimulates blood circulation. Here are some foot exercises:

1. Rise on your tiptoes: Stand with feet parallel. While holding on to a steady piece of furniture for support, rise slowly up and down on your tiptoes. This exercises the leg muscles and helps strengthen the foot muscles.

2. Extend the sole of your foot while sitting down. Extend and stretch the foot in as straight a line with the leg as possible.

3. Rotate the feet while sitting. Extend feet one at a time and rotate slowly at the ankle, as if trying to draw the largest circle possible with the big toe. Do this first in one direction, then the other.

4. Move your toes: Remain sitting with feet resting on the floor. Move the toes up and down. This will decrease internal rotation of the legs and the stretching on the leg muscles, thereby reducing tired, aching legs.

 

 

The Podiatrist is an expert for all your foot problems.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

5 Easy Tips for Managing Chronic Foot Pain

Foot pain should not be a part of your daily life. There is a way to manage chronic foot pain without resorting to drastic measures such as surgery.

You may have foot pain from growths such as plantar warts, corns or calluses. Your foot pain may also stem from wearing ill-fitting shoes or from standing on your feet all day. Fortunately, foot pain relief can be achieved at home.

Buy shoes that fit. Always try on shoes before you purchase them. If the shoe is too tight across the toe box, it will be very unpleasant to wear and will make foot pain worse. Ill-fitting shoes also cause blisters or corns on your feet. You may want to get your feet measured each time you try on shoes, as some brands fit differently than others. Your feet swell as the day goes on, so it is usually best to wait until the evening to try on and purchase shoes.

Choose shoes based on activity. If you are going for a run, wear sneakers designed for running, not walking. You use your feet differently based on what type of exercise you perform. The shoes you wear need to be designed for that activity.

Support your arches. Different people have different shapes of foot arch. For example, you may have a low arch or be flat footed. That means your entire foot touches the ground when you stand. A high arch is the opposite of flat feet. Only your heels and toes have contact with the ground.
Both types of arches need support if they cause you pain. Wear inserts in your shoes that are designed for your arch type.

Massage your feet. At the end of the day, give your feet a massage to help calm tired muscles and reduce stress and tension in your feet. Take a seat in a comfortable chair and prop one foot up on the knee of your opposite leg. Rub the foot gently. Try stretching your toes by pulling on them individually with your fingers.

Prop your feet up. Rest your feet after a long day. Sit down and elevate your feet at a 45 degree angle. Elevating your feet will help the blood flow away from them and will reduce swelling and tenderness.

Kick chronic foot pain to the curb with any one of these simple remedies. With the right shoes and some relaxation, foot pain relief can be at your doorstep.

 

See The Podiatrist if you have any problems.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz