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Foot Health: Don’t let children get caught flatfooted; arch collapse can cause problems | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

feet rolling in from behind

As you look at your children running around, it is the ideal time to focus on their foot health and well-being. Remember, it’s not normal to have pain in your feet, especially for a child.

One of the most common foot structures that can cause problems for children is flat foot, also known as pes planus. This is a condition in which there is abnormal collapse of the arch when standing. This causes excessive strain on the soft tissues and joints of the foot and ankle, which in turn, can cause pain and affect the way in which your child is able to function over time.

It is also common to have children complain of knee pain due to their abnormal foot structure, as you can imagine, if your foundation (your feet) is not functioning correctly then that affects the joints up the chain (your knees, hips, lower back).

Here are some early signs of flat feet:

1.Is your child 5 yrs or older? Any younger than this it is normal to have a flattened arch. It is around age 5 that you should start to see an arch form

2.When you look at the back of your child’s heels as they stand, do the heels tend to angle outward, with bowing of the Achilles tendon?

3.Does your child complain of foot, knee or ankle pain during or after activity? Or wake up in the middle of the night with these complaints?

4. Does your child tend to have early leg fatigue or seem to be clumsy with activity?

5. Do you, the parents, have flat feet? If so, there’s a good chance that your child will too since foot structure
is mostly hereditary.

Most parents want the best for their kids and will do what they can to ensure their child’s health and success. However, it’s not always on parent’s minds that if your child’s feet are functioning abnormally, their ability to perform in sports and play outside with their friends can be hindered, and even cause pain.

What should parents do if they suspect their child has flat feet?
It is recommended to have your child evaluated early, even before age 5 if the parents have flat feet. The earlier that your child’s feet are treated, the better the outcome is for improvement in their overall structure over time.

One of the most conservative and effective means of treatment for paediatric flatfoot is custom orthotic therapy. This is done by taking a mould of your child’s foot in what the corrected position should be and from this mould we can make an insert (orthotic) that will fit inside your child’s shoes to wear on a daily basis to keep their feet in the corrected position. The earlier we can start this correction, the greater the improvement in the structure of the feet we can make.

By doing this we can help keep your child active and happy. So remember, if you’re going shoe shopping – take a look at your child’s feet BEFORE you hit the stores. A visit to The Podiatrist may be in order. Some shoes are better than others for flat feet and knowing what to look for will save you time and money.

For all your foot care needs, visit The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz
http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

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How to Buy Children’s Shoes

A well-made shoe that fits right is not only more comfortable for your children, but can help them avoid injury. Do you know what features you should look for in your child’s footwear?

A pair of well-made shoes can keep children safe from foot problems such as sprains and strains, both in class and on the playground

Here are some tips for how to buy children’s shoes.

  • Children’s feet change with age. Shoe and sock size may change every few months as a child’s feet grow. Shoes that don’t fit      properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes, and watch for signs of irritation.
  • Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn’t mean it will fit another the same way. Also, sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete’s foot and nail fungus.
  • Examine the heels. Children may wear through the heels of shoes quicker than outgrowing shoes themselves. Uneven heel wear can indicate a foot problem that should be checked by a podiatrist.
  • Take your child shoe shopping. Every shoe fits differently. Letting a child have a say in the shoe buying process promotes healthy foot habits down the road.
  • Always buy for the larger foot. Feet are seldom precisely the same size. Buy shoes that do not need a “break-in” period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. Also make sure to have your child try on shoes with socks or tights, if that’s how they’ll be worn

Tips for Buying Children’s Athletic Footwear.

A child’s court shoe:

  • should support both sides of the foot, due to the quick lateral movements and weight shifts in court sports; and
  • provide a flexible sole for fast changes of direction.

A child’s running shoe:

  • should provide maximum shock absorption to help runners avoid ailments such as shin splints and knee pain; and
  • control the way your child’s heel strikes the ground, so the rest of the foot can fall correctly.

Athletic socks:

  • should be made of a natural/synthetic blend, as this helps “wick” away moisture best; and
  • not contain any large seams that can cause blisters or irritation.

Visit The Podiatrist if you have any questions.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz