Blog Archives

Feet ready for summer? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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One perk of a beach-bound holiday is knowing that instead of closed in shoes with socks or stockings and having your feet feeling toasty in sweaty Uggs, you can lounge happily with your toes dangling in the warm weather, shoe-free with the sand at your feet. But alas, the dream does come with its own set of tootsie troubles. Even if you are just lying still on your back soaking up the rays, your feet are still vulnerable. You can seriously sunburn your feet and no matter how upscale your hotel, athlete’s foot can lurk in all public pool areas.

  1. Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete’s foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
  2. Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
  3. Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don’t forget to reapply after you’ve been in the water.
  4. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking water will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  5. Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.
  6. Some activities at the beach, lake, or river may require different types of footwear to be worn, so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
  7. If you injure your foot or ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from a podiatric physician. Many often only contact a doctor when something is broken or sprained, but a podiatrist can begin treating your ailment immediately while you’re away from home. Use our Find a Podiatrist tool to get treatment wherever your travels take you!
  8. In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go foot gear:
    • Flip flops—for the pool, spa, hotel room, and airport security check points
    • Sterile bandages—for covering minor cuts and scrapes
    • Antibiotic cream—to treat any skin injury
    • Emollient-enriched cream—to hydrate feet
    • Blister pads or moleskin—to protect against blisters
    • Motrin or Advil (anti-inflammatory)—to ease tired, swollen feet
    • Toenail clippers—to keep toenails trimmed
    • Emery board—to smooth rough edges or broken nails
    • Pumice stone—to soften callused skin
    • Sunscreen—to protect against the scorching sun
    • Aloe vera or Silvadene cream—to relieve sunburns

 

We have an extensive range of foot creams to help with those dry and cracked heels. Come and have a look.

For all your foot care needs- see The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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Southern Cross Easy-Claims| The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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Easy-claim

Southern Cross Health Society Easy-claim (“Easy-claim”) is a convenient way for Southern Cross members to claim for eligible healthcare services at the time of purchase, without completing a claim form.

How to use Easy-claim

You can use Easy-claim at The Podiatrist. Simply present your Member card or your app at the counter when you are purchasing eligible healthcare products and services.

If your plan covers the product or service and it qualifies, we’ll reimburse the provider directly and you’ll only pay any remaining contribution you’re responsible for, so you don’t have to worry about filling out claim forms or waiting for a refund.*

For all your foot problems- call The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Tel: (09) 550 6325

 

Happy Holidays |The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Morton’s Neuroma: Treatment options for foot pain | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

morton's neuroma

Did you know you have 26 bones, 33 joints and more than 100 muscles in your foot? With such a complex structure, it’s no wonder foot pain is so common.

Morton’s Neuroma is caused by a thickening of the tissue around one of the nerves that leads out to your toes. It usually happens between the third and fourth toes, and can sometimes feel like a pebble stuck in your sock.
Risk factors for the condition include:

• Having foot abnormalities like bunions, hammertoes or arch problems
• Wearing high heels, which can put extra pressure on your toes
• Participating in high-impact sports like running, which can cause repetitive trauma to your feet

Treatment options for Morton’s Neuroma depend on the severity of your symptoms, but here are some options your doctor may suggest:
• Wearing shoes with wider toe boxes
• Physical therapy
• custom-made orthotics
• Anti-inflammatory medications taken orally or injected into the area
• Nerve-blocking injections
• Decompression surgery that relieves pressure by cutting nearby strictures
• Surgery to remove the nerve causing pain

Talk to The Podiatrist to decide on the best treatment option for you.

Do you have a health question for The Podiatrist? Please send it to caron@thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Tips For Patients With Toenail Fungus | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

fungal nail infections need not ruin your summer

Now that summer is here, many people begin to lose sight of the appearance of their toes. While people will begin to bring out their open- toed shoes and sandals, it is important to continue to maintain healthy, happy toes during the summer.
Toenail fungus is a fungal condition that develops when fungus enters and grows beneath the toenail. Although it can also affect fingernails, toenail fungus is more likely to occur in feet rather than hands. Patients can develop toenail fungus from an array of different sources. In many cases, it can be hard to diagnose the exact cause of toenail fungus, which makes it harder to prevent reoccurrence. The fungus that is responsible for the infection tends to thrive best in warm and wet environments, such as the shower or locker room.
By following basic foot care guidelines patients can head off most common foot fungus problems. Toenail fungus thrives in warm, damp places. For this reason, The Podiatrist urges patients to take extra precautions in pools and locker rooms. Patients should also wear dry cotton socks-changing them two or three times a day if needed.
It is also important to remember not to share shoes or socks with anyone, as this fungus can easily spread through sharing of shoes or socks. This is the same for nail clippers or nail files-don’t share. By taking extra precautions you can ensure the health of your toes and fee.
For all your foot problems, see The Podiatrist
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

SOS guide to Happy Feet | The Podiatrist and your feetnz

 

 

When the weather gets hot, the shoes come off. Walking around in flip-flops, sandals or even barefoot can feel great, but it can also hurt the skin on your feet.

As we get ready for the summer , prepare to bare your soles with our SOS guide to putting your best foot forward.

Killer Heels
High heels force the weight of the body onto the ball of the foot, which can cause a build up of callus and bunions and an increased incidence of corns under the metatarsal. ‘Posture is affected as the body is thrown forward and the spine can become mis-aligned which can lead to a painful back, hip and knees. Repeated high heel wearers are also prone to shortening of the Achilles tendon making walking on flat surfaces without heels painful.

Top tip: Heels are fine if worn in moderation, but it should be remembered that pain is an indicator that something is wrong! Vary the style of shoe from day to day (platforms or wedges are better than stilettos despite the height of the heel). Gel insoles are also good for reducing pressure on the ball of the foot.

Flat Out
Flat shoes can pose as many risks as high heels. Wearing completely flat pumps puts the feet at risk from pain as there is no shock absorbency and little support. Another problem can be corms and calluses as pumps are often worn a size too small in order to keep them on the foot. Flip-flops don’t fare much better either. Research has shown that flip-flop wearers take shorter steps resulting in a higher risk of joint and muscle pain. Added to this, wearing flat shoes can stretch the calf muscles and Achilles tendon especially if used to wearing heels.

Lumps and bumps

Calluses: A callus is an area of toughened skin developed in response to repeated contact or pressure and is one of the most common foot problems. Generally pain-free (although they can produce a burning sensation), they can lead to more serious problems such as underlying tissue damage if left unchecked. Prevention is the best cure and wearing shoes that fit properly is the first port of call.

Corns: A corn is essentially the same thing as a callous only it is a more localized thickening of the skin which appears as a cone-shaped mass and is most commonly found on the toes. Seeking professional assessment from The Podiatrist is highly recommended.

Cracked Heels: More of a cosmetic problem than a serious concern, cracked heels often affect people who have naturally dry skin and is exacerbated by lifestyle factors such as standing for long periods of time.

Bunions: Tight fitting shoes are thought to be the cause of bunions in about 90 per cent of patients although they can be inherited. Most people experience them as a bump on the base of the big toe but as they develop the big toe begins to angle in towards the other toes. The solution? Be careful with shoe styles if you know that you are developing one but once developed surgery to realign the metatarsal is usually required.

Ingrowing Toenails: This is a painful condition that occurs when the nail starts to press into the fleshy art of the adjacent skin. It can easily become infected and needs professional podiatry treatment. Badly cut toenails and ill-fitting shoes are the most common causes.

See The Podiatrist for any foot care problems or advice.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz