Blog Archives

Flat feet- Children’s feet | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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Children with flat feet, also called pes planus, have a flattening of the arch during standing and walking.

Flat foot is normal in infants and young children. At this age, in the absence of any associated symptoms, treatment is highly debatable.

Flat foot usually naturally corrects itself as muscles strengthen and soft tissues stiffen. The height of the arch in the foot increases with age until about 9 years. The problem is when flat foot persists, spontaneously occurs in older children or later in life, or is associated with pain and disability.

Flat feet can be flexible or rigid, painful or painless and associated with a tightness of the calf muscles (Achilles tendon). The majority of flat feet are painless, but when pain is present it is usually during weight-bearing activities such as walking and running. The pain can be in the sole of the foot, the ankle, or non-specific pain all around the foot area.

 

What causes flat feet?

A complex and sophisticated interaction of bones, ligaments, muscles and nerves within and above the foot defines its anatomy and function. Anything that interrupts the integrity of these structures leading to a collapsed arch can cause symptomatic flat feet.

Examination of the foot begins with an examination of the entire child, because the flat foot may have an underlying cause.

Flat foot can also originate from unusual anatomy such as a tarsal coalition (bones joined together), ligament or muscle damage, restricted ankle movement, outward rotated lower legs, and knock knees (where the legs bow inwards at the knee). Obesity can result in collapse of the arches by the increased load on the foot. If knock knees also develop, the middle of the foot will tend to turn out (abduct). The foot will point outwards when walking, instead of straight ahead, which is inefficient and can cause early fatigue.

Footwear in early childhood has been thought to cause flat foot. It is likely that children who wear shoes, are not physically active and have flat feet will have decreased muscle activation in their feet and thus impaired foot function and weakness.

Some older children and adolescents develop flat feet in the absence of any disorder or associated factors.

 

Does flat foot need to be treated?

Flat feet require treatment only if clearly associated with pain or decreased function. Managing the underlying cause or disease is of highest priority; just treating the symptoms should be secondary.

If flat foot is observed in a child who is overweight and has knock knees, or in a child with excess joint flexibility and poor footwear, each of these factors could be contributing to the symptoms, and each should be addressed.

If a child’s quality of life is affected by how their feet look, feel or function, then the associated issues should be addressed.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

5 quick and easy tips to healthy feet and legs | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

one pair has to last a lifetime

There are many causes of leg pain right from muscle cramps and inflammation of tendons to arthritis, varicose veins and nerve damage. Leg pain due to muscle strain following an injury or wearing tight shoes for a long time can be prevented by following few simple tips:

  1. Stretch the leg muscle: One of the most effective ways to prevent leg pain due to a sudden muscle twist or cramp is to stretch the muscle. This not only improves blood flow to the injured muscle but it also helps in reducing muscle tension thereby relieving muscle soreness.
  2. Take a warm shower: If you suffer from leg pain, then take a warm shower to relax the muscles. If taking a bath is not feasible, then placing a heating pad on the affected areas can also help. A heat pack works best if the pain is due to a previous injury as it not only relaxes blood vessels but also improves blood circulation, alleviating leg pain.
  3. Wear a proper fitting athletic shoe: Most people fail to choose the right fitting shoe, which is one of the common causes of leg and heel pain. To get the right fit, determine the shape of your foot using the ‘wet test’. For this, step out of the shower onto a surface that will show your footprint, like a brown paper bag. If you have a flat foot, you will see an impression of your whole foot on the paper. If you have a high arch, you will only see the ball and heel of your foot. When shopping, look for athletic shoes that match your particular foot pattern.
  4. Choose the right sports shoe: Not many people are aware that different types of shoes are specially designed to meet your sports requirement. Did you know running long distances in court-style sneakers can contribute to shin splints? It is important to choose the shoes according to your sport or fitness routine.
  5. Go slow if you are a beginner at the gym: One of the common mistakes that most people commit is to overexert on the first day of the gym, which not only exerts pressure on the knee but also causes muscle soreness and leg pain. The key to preventing leg pain and sticking to your workout routine is to build your fitness level slowly. You can start off with less strenuous workouts and then gradually increase the duration, intensity, and frequency of your exercise regimen.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Shopping for School Shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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  1. To avoid in-store arguments, parents and children should discuss in advance the style and brand of shoes they want to look for.
  1. Remember that a good fit is more important than the size of the footwear. A good fit allows for a 1/2” of space between the end of the toes and the end of shoe. Shop at retailers who provide a fit specialist for extra assistance.
  1. Avoid hand-me-down shoes; improperly fitted shoes can support feet in unhealthy positions.

4. Avoid shopping online or estimating a child’s shoe size.

  1. Remember that not all shoes of the same size fit alike. While foot measurement is a starting point, how the shoes fit is more important.
  1. Match the shape of the shoe to the shape of the foot.
  1. Remember that while a low arch is normal in young children, in children older than age seven, the lower the arch the more important it is to have shoes with good support. Look for a firm heel counter and stiffness when trying to twist shoes lengthwise.
  2. If a child wears orthotics, select shoes with removable foot beds and try the shoes on with the orthotics in place.
  1. Remember that price is not necessarily commensurate with quality. If price is a consideration, last year’s models can offer all the features needed at a discounted price.
  1. Check the fit on your child’s shoes on a regular basis as children’s feet grow at irregular rates.

For more information, or if you have any questions, contact The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Keep those feet happy | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

foot-care

The importance of our feet has been understood for centuries. Even the Greek philosopher Socrates is reputed to have said, “To him whose feet hurt, everything hurts.” So, what comprises foot care that promotes comfort at any age?

  • Wear shoes and socks that fit and are comfortable.
  • Be sure your toes are not cramped.
  • Change socks daily and if possible have two pairs of shoes in everyday use so that you can alternate the pairs daily.
  • Elastic laces are handy if your feet swell.

Shoes should be worn that cover, protect, provide stability for the foot and minimize the chance of falls.

Whatever your age – student or grandparent – foot care is important.

  • Remember to cut or file your nails straight across and never shorter than the end of your toe.
  • If you are older, and particularly if you are diabetic, it is helpful to get The Podiatrist to do your foot care.
  • It is best to wash feet daily and always test the water’s temperature beforehand. Pat, do not rub, your feet dry and remember to dry between and under the toes. If your feet are bothering you you’ll find that short soaks of even ten minutes are soothing.
  • Use a lanolin (ointment base) moisturizing cream for dry and cracked skin. If your feet perspire, dust lightly with talcum powder. Remember to remove excess cream of powder from between your toes to avoid skin problems. If you are diabetic it is wise to examine your feet daily.
  • Exercise each day if possible. Walking is always good but there are also special foot exercises that can be done like rolling your feet over a rolling pin several times daily or picking up a crumpled towel with your toes.

Despite reasonable care throughout life, however, the older foot is subject to problems. Heredity is a factor as are the stresses over the years and complications from systemic diseases. It has been estimated that at least 80 percent of people over 50 have at least one foot problem.

The most common are corns and calluses, ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, strained arches, heel pain and arthritis including gout.

In many cases there can be improvements jus by switching shoes to the type with wider, box-type toes. Also. shoe size can actually change with added years.

Feet carry our body’s weight, help hold us erect, co-ordinate and maintain balance in walking. We need to give them tender, loving and skilled care.

The returns are high, including the joy of a walk.

Make an appointment with The Podiatrist today.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Cracked Heels: Remedies For Men (and women) | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

cracked heesl can be very painful

Fissures, commonly referred to as cracked heels, are not only troublesome and painful, they tend to cause a lot of embarrassment. People often regard cracked heels as a sign of inadequate foot care and hygiene. However, there may be several different factors that could affect your feet and lead to the development of fissures or lesions on the heels. At times heel cracks could indicate certain nutritional deficiencies.
For many, the appearance of cracks on the heels is more of an embarrassment or an inconvenience. At times these fissures could cause immense amount of pain. This could make it difficult for standing, walking or to wear certain kinds of footwear. Most men don’t bother about the health of their feet, but it’s an important part of one’s daily hygiene. So keep reading to know the remedies for treating cracked heels.

Follow These Tips For Foot Care:
It is better to take good care of your feet and avoid risks of having cracked heels than push the matter till you endure pain and then cure the fissures. If you are way past the prevention stage and are already enduring pain and wounds, there are lots of home remedies you can follow to treat cracked feet. Once you cure cracked heels, it is time you take precautions to prevent occurrence of fissures. Your heels are hard skin designed to carry your weight.

File or pumice stone.
Soak your feet in some warm water for about 15 to 20 minutes, to soften the skin. With the help of a file or a pumice stone get rid of the dead skin by rubbing on your cracked heel gently. Apply a good foot moisturising cream and leave it for about 20 minutes till the moisturiser is absorbed by the heels.
Wear a pair of socks overnight or through the day to help keep it moist. Do the same once every day for about a week to see noticeable difference.
See The Podiatrist for your cracked heels
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Happy New Year from The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

happy new year from The Podiatist and your feetnz

We are back.
Hope you all had an enjoyable Holiday.

Do you feet need some tender loving care?
Cracked heels?
Sore feet?
Footwear advice?
Verruccaes?
Corns?
Calluses?
Ingrown toenails?
Arch pain?
Heel pain?

Make an appointment today.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

A Holiday Survival Guide For Strappy Sandals Lovers- Foot care solutions to get you through the season in style

Dr Scholls toe protectors are great to wear

It has been reported that 87% of women have foot problems from wearing painfully ill-fitting shoes, it is time for some serious thinking about foot care and what can you do to preserve those tender tootsies while still partying like its 1999 in strappy sandals this holiday season.

Foot care is extremely important, and it often gets forgotten. Going to the salon to get a pedicure isn’t enough—regular maintenance is key, and should be part of your routine. Keep foot care products such as the Gehwol Creams and a pumice in the shower year-round so that it’s not a huge undertaking. Spend 30 seconds on each foot at least twice a week.

This is a program to help relax the foot muscles, prevent ugly blisters, and lessen the likelihood of bunions.
For starters, a good ‘ole foot soak with Gehwol Herbal Bath Salts relieves weary foot pain and swelling, and moisturizes as you soak the feet. Peppermint is often regarded as ‘the world’s oldest medicine, known for its relaxing, cooling effects on the body and mind. The Gehwol Mint cream is ideal for aching feet.

For daytime moisturizing, I use the Gehwol Blue or Green, or even the Balm creams. To prevent blisters, corns and burning pains over the balls of your feet, try some Dr Scholl’s toe protectors, or Foot Angel pads.

For an overnight emollient, you need a slightly thicker, lusher cream. The Gewhol Hydrolipid or Cracked Skin Salve.
Within days of caring for your feet, you will be strutting around with no pains at all.

gehwol

For any problems, see The Podiatrist- for all your foot care needs.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Scrub up for summer: getting your feet fabulous | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

summer

Summer is just round the corner and whilst a lot of us have become preoccupied with toning our tummies, banishing the bingo wings and perfecting those pins, there’s one aspect of our bodies that might have been a little overlooked… our feet.
They’ve been covered up for almost 6 months, living under tights, socks and slippers, being crammed into boots, pumps and trainers so it’s probably safe to say your tootsies aren’t looking all that fresh. If you want to get your feet prepped in time for summer, sandals and sand then read on for some handy pampering tips:
First things first, before you begin the beauty regime it’s time to talk foot-health. If you’ve been experiencing pain or discomfort over the winter months that won’t go away despite frequently changing your footwear then it’s time you spoke to The Podiatrist to help suss out what’s wrong and advise on the best footwear to help correct your feet.
Next, take an evening to soak both your feet in warm water. You can add salts or herbal oils to relieve stress – lavender is a good option here. Take some Epsom bath salts and add this to your foot spa. After your feet have been soaking for ten minutes, rub the salts clockwise on the skin of your feet to help remove any dead skin that might have built up over the winter months.
After twenty minutes of soaking, take a pumice to remove any excess dry skin, rinsing your feet afterwards.
Once your feet have dried, take a nail file and clippers and get to work on those unruly nails! Cut and file away until each nail is looking equal/

Apply a moisturising lotion. Use lots, and take this time to sit and chill – moisturising your feet works best when you don’t immediately have to put socks and shoes on straight away as you need to give your feet time to soak in the moisture.
Ta-da! Your feet are prepped and ready to step into summer.

For all your foot care needs- see The Podiatrist
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Simple guide to care for your feet | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

foot-soak-bowl

Your feet need just a little bit of tender loving care
Your feet take the brunt of your weight for hours everyday. And unfortunately they are, at times, also the most ignored part of your body. Don’t wait for aching feet to get your attention. Your feet take the impact of your entire body weight and help you balance. And any injury on your muscles, tendons and ligaments can be very debilitating. Your feet face a number of problems. From foot odour, cracked heels, corns bunions, ingrown nails and fungal infections can cause a lot of discomfort. While some problems can’t be avoided, some can be avoided by paying a little extra attention to your feet. A simple daily regimen keeps your feet functioning well…
Choose the right footwear
If you wear shoes that are ill-fitting, painful or loose, you’re inviting foot problems. Your shoes have to fit just right — neither too tight nor too loose. Shoes that are tight are known to cause corns, ingrown toenails and aches. On the other hand, shoes that are loose, don’t allow your your heels from settling in properly, increasing your chances of blisters, calluses and sore heels. Always buy footwear at the latter part of the day because your feet expand towards the end of the day. Avoid wearing heels regularly — they can damage the bones of your feet. Instead, opt for a comfortable pair of flats or one inch heels from daily wear. Shoes made out of synthetics don’t breathe well because they trap moisture and heat; go in for natural materials like leather and cotton which keep feet cool. Try and alternate your shoes, so that both pairs have a chance to dry out before being worn again.
Go for regular walks
While we tend to be on our feet all day long, regular exercise for your feet is also important. Your foot muscles need exercise to remain strong, and keep tendons and ligaments flexible.
You can use arch support inserts if you like. These keep your feet in the correct position and support your weight when you walk.
Wash your feet
While washing your feet daily in the shower is a must, make it a habit to wash them at the end of the day as well. Especially if you wear closed shoes, the moisture and sweat makes it easy for bacteria and fungi to flourish between your toes causing bad odour and even fungal infections. Washing your feet will ensure that nothing dirty accumulates. Dry your feet well and use a foot powder if you want.
Moisturise well
If you moisturise your body, why skip your feet? While the skin on your feet is rougher (because of the daily wear and tear), it is also more prone to being drier and cracked. Use a lotion, which is rich in cocoa butter, which is a natural emollient and excellent for feet. Apply it when you go to bed at night and wear socks so that the lotion can stay on yout feet instead of getting rubbed off on the sheets. Even if you’re at home, make it a habit to wear socks — whether you’ve moisturised your feet or no. Socks protect your feet from blisters and absorb moisture.
Have regular appointments with The Podiatrist
Treat yourself to an appointment once a month at least. Soaking your feet and exfoliating your soles makes them softer and healthier. Use only Gewhol foot care products (which are available at The Podiatrist)

Contact The Podiatrist if you have any problems.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Heel Pain: Skin Treatment Options for Cracked Heels | The Podiatrist and YourFeetNZ

cracked heels can be very painful

Has the summer left you with dry and cracked skin on your heels?
Dry and cracked skin on your heels can lead straight to severe heel pain if you don’t do something about it. If your heels are so badly cracked that they are bleeding, talk to your doctor to make sure you don’t have other underlying problems. For run-of-the-mill dry skin, you can try taming the problem yourself.

Showers and Baths

Use only warm water for showers and baths. Hot water may feel great while you’re in it, but it dries out your skin even more. You should also avoid harsh soaps and body washes. Instead, use unfragranced gentle soaps that can help clean your skin without stripping away essential oils and moisture.

Moisturize Your Skin

Immediately after your shower or bath, pat your skin dry and apply a moisturizer. Moisturizers with urea are much better for severely dry skin because they keep the moisture from evaporating before it can sink into your skin. Apply moisturizer to your skin regularly, especially when your skin is repairing itself.

Severely Dry or Cracked Heels

If your heel pain is caused by severely dry or cracked heels, moisturizer alone may not be enough. Keep up with your regular after-shower routine, but at night slather your feet with petroleum jelly. Add a pair of socks to keep the jelly from rubbing off your feet and leave them on overnight. In the morning you should notice a big difference. I’ve found that doing this for a few nights a week, especially in winter, keeps heels from cracking.
We have an extensive range of Gehwol foot creams for all foot types.
See The Podiatrist for any foot problems.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz