Blog Archives

Kids- their feet and shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

childrens orthoses are not like adults

If you have active kids, making sure they’re wearing the right shoes for what they’re doing, and for their own unique physique, can be as important and wearing their retainers or washing their faces.

  • One in three children who plays a team sport is injured seriously enough to miss practice or games.
  • Children’s bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments are still growing, making them more susceptible to injury.

When it comes to issues of our kids’ we need to know to keep them safe, and help them understand how to do things right.

A few things we can do, and remind them to do, include:

  • Kids should have at least one or two days off from any particular sport each week to avoid overuse injuries.
  • If you experience a foot or ankle injury while playing sports, early attention is key to preventing further damage. Always ice the injury, never use heat.
  • Choose footwear specific to your activity. Sneakers made for tennis players will provide different support and traction than cleats made for football players.
  • If you participate in a certain sport at least two to three times a week, you should wear a sport-specific shoe.
  • Go to a store that specializes in athletic shoes, or The Podiatrist for suggestions.
  • Be sure to have their feet measured every time you purchase new shoes, as feet size and shape can change (especially in kids) as we age.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Advertisements

Make sure the shoe fits

 

 

 

CHOOSING the right shoe for school for Winter is important for growing feet, but often the choice is complicated by a preference for fashion over function.

All the kids want is what is in fashion, but they’re just not right for school, and are often not suitable for the wet weather.

Mums don’t mind spending the dollars but in choosing the right shoe, they need to be aware of fit, length and width as well as style. Children spend many hours a day in these shoes so they (shoes) need to be sturdy and durable.

If you buy a cheap synthetic shoe you’ll increase the likelihood of tinea (athletes foot) which rises massively in closed-in shoes and wet weather.

When buying, look at the breathability. Leather and mesh are always better options.

Ask your footwear provider to make certain that what you are buying is appropriate- after all, they are the experts.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz

 

Choose the right shoes

Choosing the right running shoe is an important part of your overall running comfort. It can be the difference between enjoying your run and sustaining long term injury. But how do you choose a shoe?

Surely a running shoe is just a shoe? Not so.

Comfort is important

Comfort and cushioning are important features to consider when buying a shoe. This might sound obvious to you, but, if the shoe feels rigid, too flexible or narrow, too soft or hard, then rather don’t get it. Your first experience doesn’t guarantee later experience, but if it’s not good then, it’s unlikely that it’ll get better over time.

If you’re a first-time buyer, it’s obviously different. You’ll need to try the shoe on and remember that if it’s not perfectly comfortable when you lace it up, then it probably won’t be comfortable after an hour of running.

Flexibility of the shoe, and even its shape, make just any old cross trainers unsuitable. They also tend not to give much support to the arches.

Many of us are lured by the look of shoe, and by the gadgets and marketing. “People want the ‘air’ or the ‘gel’ or any of the array of marketing claims, because they’ve either read about it, or a famous athlete uses the shoe, or they have friends who recommend it.” But there are other factors you need to consider too, such as whether or not you tend to pronate.

Do you pronate?

This involves the rotation of the foot outwards during the landing period.

That means that those who pronate land on the outside of the foot (usually at the heel) and then roll in, over towards the big toe. When this happens too much or too fast, there is believed to be a risk of injury because of the weight that joints have to support.

Many people do find that a stability shoe helps them because it does change the movement of the foot. These are the shoes that have a built up inner portion, so that when the foot lands, it is “blocked” from rotating inwards.

If you do this excessively, then you might be better off in these shoes, whereas people who roll in normally are better off in cushioned shoes.

You must be careful not to choose a heavy shoe that restricts movement of the foot.

If you find you are in some pain in your feet after running, rather see a Podiatrist for expert opinion.

How long will your shoes last?

Generally with shoes, one talks about the mileage of the shoe, and not about the time the shoe lasts, for the obvious reason that some people will run once a week, whereas others run six times a week, and so over six months, the shoe is used completely differently!

Even for mileage, it can be difficult, because it depends so much on the runner. Mass is obviously a key factor – 100kg running 8km is going to wear a shoe differently compared to 65kg running 8km.

Mechanics also affect the shoe, because it wears a shoe in different places. Generally, shoes will last 600km as a minimum, more in some people.

The only way to really gauge is when the midsole starts to get so compacted that it loses all its softness. Or, it gets compacted one side, but not the other, so the shoe starts to “lean”. Or the black rubber outsole wears away.

If you have any foot problems, see The Podiatrist