Blog Archives

Your foot size may change during pregnancy

 

When was the last time you had your feet measured? If you can’t quite remember, your so-called tried-and-true shoes may have your feet crying out for a different size.

That’s right, according to a recent survey conducted by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), 40 percent of male and female respondents couldn’t remember the last time their feet were measured. Additionally, 65 percent of American women between the ages of 18 and 49 haven’t had their feet measured within the last five years — meaning they are probably trekking around in shoes that don’t fit.

And since the survey also reports that 84 percent of both male and female respondents chose comfort over style when buying non-athletic shoes, its surprising that foot measurements have gone by the wayside.

Many people don’t realize that shoe size can change with age, from manufacturer to manufacturer and for many women during pregnancy. Not to mention, an ill-fitting shoe can wreak havoc on your feet. With the possibility of painful blisters and unsightly corns to unnerving neuromas and irritating bunions, there’s nothing like finding a shoe with the perfect fit.

Here are a few tips that will help you put your best foot forward:

* It’s important to remember that when you’re getting fitted for a new shoe, you should wait until later in the day because your feet swell throughout the afternoon. And be sure to stand when your feet are being measured or fitted.

* Don’t be surprised if your feet aren’t the same size. If you have this problem, try to buy for the larger foot.

* You wouldn’t buy a car without a test drive, so the same rule should apply to your shoes. Always try on both shoes, and walk around the store, preferably on a hard surface.

* Stay away from shoes that require a “break-in” period. Properly fitting shoes should be comfortable immediately.

* Conduct a “dress rehearsal.” Try on shoes while you are wearing the same type of socks or stockings you expect to wear with the shoes.

For more information and guidelines on caring for your feet see The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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Quality Paediatric Foot Care at Kids ‘n Motion Podiatry

Kids ‘n Motion Podiatry- Leading Podiatrist in Children’s Foot Problems, invites parents to bring their children into the one of its kind in Auckland- a child specific Podiatry practice. The clinic has a friendly environment and is ideally set up for assessing children of all ages (lots of fun activities). Parents are asked to be cautious of the health of their children’s feet to help maintain a healthy, active life style.

Children with strong, healthy feet avoid many kinds of lower extremity problems later in life. That is why it is important to inspect your children’s feet periodically. If a problem is suspected, I encourage you to bring your children into the clinic for evaluation. It is always our joy to make sure our paediatric patients remain fit, and active with healthy feet.

The size and shape of an infant’s feet change quickly during their first year. Because a baby’s feet are flexible, too much pressure or strain can affect the shape of their feet. It’s important to allow an infant to kick and stretch their feet freely. The Podiatrist also suggests that parents make sure their baby’s shoes and socks do not squeeze the toes, as this can cause painful foot conditions.

For toddlers, it is important to not force them to walk before they are ready. Once walking begins naturally, watch the toddler’s gait. Many toddlers have a pigeon-toe gait, which is normal. Some will initially learn to walk landing on their toes instead of their heels, but most children outgrow both of these problems. The Podiatrist informs parents that conditions detected early can be treated more easily than waiting for pain to occur.

The foot’s bone structure is well-formed by the time children reach age seven or eight, but if a growth plate (the area where bone growth begins) is injured, the damaged plate may cause the bone to grow oddly. With The Podiatrist’s care, however, the risk of future bone problems is reduced.

The Podiatrist urges parents to check their child’s show size often, making sure there is space between the toes and the end of the shoe and that the shoes are roomy enough to allow the toes to move freely. Whether children are experiencing heel pain, knee pain, or any other conditions, The Podiatrist invites parents to bring their children in.

Kids ‘n Motion Podiatry is committed to providing patients with exceptional care.

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

A parent’s guide to foot health for athletic kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the Olympics approaching in July, you can expect to witness some amazing feats of athleticism this summer. But Olympic athletes won’t be the only ones competing hard in sports – so will your kids.

Millions of children worldwide will participate in sports this year, from softball to soccer and swimming to cycling. No matter what their sport or whether they play competitively or just for fun, they will have one important thing in common: They’ll need their feet to be pain-free if they’re going to play their best and prevent injuries.

Sports play a significant role in the lives of millions of young athletes. Parents need to be aware that sports, which require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries. Protecting children’s feet from injuries, and bringing them to a podiatrist when problems occur, can help keep kids in the game and make the sport more enjoyable.

Some tips for helping protect children’s feet while playing sports:

* Protective taping of the ankles is often necessary to help prevent sprains or fractures.

* Buying a shoe designed for the specific sport your child plays not only improves your child’s performance in the sport, it also can help protect him or her from serious foot and ankle injuries.

* Without the right sock, even the best athletic shoe won’t score points-on the field or off. Athletic socks should consist of a natural/synthetic blend, which is best at wicking away moisture and minimizing foot odour. Socks should not have large seams that might cause blisters or irritation.

Commonly played sports and the risks associated with them include:

* Netball and Basketball – Children playing basketball may be at risk for ankle sprains, tendinitis and plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the thick band of tissue on the sole of the foot). To minimize the risk of foot injury, choose a shoe with a thick, stiff sole, high ankle support and shock absorption.

* Tennis – The rapid, repetitive lateral movements and shifting of weight required of tennis players can lead to injuries such as ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis and corns or calluses. Tennis players will do best with a flexible-soled shoe that supports both sides of the foot.

* Running – Movements required of runners include leg extension and hitting the balls of the feet with a great deal of force. Running can lead to shin splints, heel pain and blisters. A good running shoe should offer good support and shock absorption. In some cases, custom orthotics may be necessary to provide additional support and control of foot motion.

* Rugby and Soccer – The running, jumping and lateral movements required of rugby and soccer players can lead to many foot injuries, with heel pain and shin splints being among the most common. Rugby and soccer boots should provide multiple cleats in the heel area and enough room for thick .

Sports-related foot and ankle injuries are on the rise as more children participate actively in sports. Parents need to be vigilant to ensure children’s feet remain healthy and safe. And remember – lack of complaint by a child is not a reliable sign that everything is fine. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.

Ensuring your child’s feet stay healthy could go a long way – your young athlete could one day be the next superstar athlete. If your child participates in strenuous sports, monitor his or her foot health closely. If you suspect a problem, take your child to The Podiatrist for evaluation and treatment

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz