Blog Archives

Feet ready for summer? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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One perk of a beach-bound holiday is knowing that instead of closed in shoes with socks or stockings and having your feet feeling toasty in sweaty Uggs, you can lounge happily with your toes dangling in the warm weather, shoe-free with the sand at your feet. But alas, the dream does come with its own set of tootsie troubles. Even if you are just lying still on your back soaking up the rays, your feet are still vulnerable. You can seriously sunburn your feet and no matter how upscale your hotel, athlete’s foot can lurk in all public pool areas.

  1. Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete’s foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
  2. Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
  3. Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don’t forget to reapply after you’ve been in the water.
  4. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking water will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  5. Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.
  6. Some activities at the beach, lake, or river may require different types of footwear to be worn, so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
  7. If you injure your foot or ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from a podiatric physician. Many often only contact a doctor when something is broken or sprained, but a podiatrist can begin treating your ailment immediately while you’re away from home. Use our Find a Podiatrist tool to get treatment wherever your travels take you!
  8. In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go foot gear:
    • Flip flops—for the pool, spa, hotel room, and airport security check points
    • Sterile bandages—for covering minor cuts and scrapes
    • Antibiotic cream—to treat any skin injury
    • Emollient-enriched cream—to hydrate feet
    • Blister pads or moleskin—to protect against blisters
    • Motrin or Advil (anti-inflammatory)—to ease tired, swollen feet
    • Toenail clippers—to keep toenails trimmed
    • Emery board—to smooth rough edges or broken nails
    • Pumice stone—to soften callused skin
    • Sunscreen—to protect against the scorching sun
    • Aloe vera or Silvadene cream—to relieve sunburns

 

We have an extensive range of foot creams to help with those dry and cracked heels. Come and have a look.

For all your foot care needs- see The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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What causes corns and calluses? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

corns an callus are easily treated by The Podiatrist

Corns and calluses can be quite painful.

The chances are, you will, at some point in your life, experience corns or calluses on your feet. Sometimes a little extra scraping with a pumice stone, or even a careful slicing with a razor blade or similar sharp implement, during a day at the spa may suffice. But are those individuals really knowledgeable about your feet and health and safety issues?

Seeing The Podiatrist to remove painful corns and calluses safely with sterile instruments and medical knowledge is crucial. Under no circumstances should you attempt to cut the corn or callus yourself. You could make it more painful, and it might become infected. You can, occasionally, use a pumice stone or foot file to rub down skin that is getting thick.

Typical symptoms include:

  •  Thickening of the skin
  •  A hardened, raised bump or pit in the skin
  •  Pain with pressure over skin irritations

Corns and calluses are annoying and potentially painful skin thickenings that form in areas of excessive pressure. A callus is often a flattened area of thick skin, while a corn is a thick, localized area that usually has a circular shape.

People of all ages can be affected, but they are particularly common in those over age 65. Corns and calluses have been shown to affect 20 to 65 per cent of people in this age range.

Podiatrists can also measure and fit people with custom-made orthotic devices to redistribute the weight on their feet while they walk so that pressure from the foot bones don’t focus on their corns. Off-the-shelf cushioned insoles are one-size-fits-all and may not be as effective.

Calluses and corns can often be prevented by reducing or eliminating the circumstances that lead to increased pressure at specific points on the feet.

Discuss your options with The Podiatrist, the professional foot care experts.

If you or a family member is experiencing any unusual sensations or symptoms with your feet, perhaps it’s time to seek professional help and book a consultation for a thorough examination, diagnosis and possible treatment.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

5 Tips To Care For Your Toenails | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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No matter how hard you try to keep your face look beautiful, a dirty foot is more than enough to spoil the whole impression. Keeping your toenails neat and clean is one of the most important favours that you can do to your feet.
Clean toenails are important not only for your beauty, but also for your health.

BEAUTY MISTAKES THAT AGE YOU

There are many reasons that can affect the health of toenails. Conditions such as Athlete’s foot and fungal infections are commonly related to toenail infections and inflammations. Apart from that, your feet always come in contact with dust and dirt, making it more prone to carry disease causing microorganisms. Constant wearing of socks and shoe, especially in this hot summer, is also a culprit in toenail infections due to the increased production and accumulation of sweat. Most people are unsuccessful in keeping their toenails clean because they are not aware about ways on how to clean toenails properly. Following the use of suitable products and correct technique will definitely contribute to your foot care regimen. If you wonder how to clean toe nails properly, we are here to help you.

Wash daily:
Make sure that you wash your feet daily, especially before going to bed. This will help remove any accumulated dust and dirt. Do not use too harsh soap or detergent to wash your feet as it may cause extreme skin dryness. Dry your feet by wiping gently with a towel. A foot clean practice before going to bed will also help prevent taking diseases to your bed.

Cutting toenails:
If you feel you are not confident in doing it yourself, visit The Podiatrist. Cut properly: One of the most common reasons why people get toenail problems is the wrong nail cutting technique. It is recommended to cut the nails straight, instead of a curve. This will prevent the complications that occur due to ingrown toenails. But, if you prefer only a round shape, don’t worry; use a nail file to smoothen the ridges. Make sure that you are cutting your nails in the right length.

Make toenail care a part of your daily body care regimen. This will help avoid the development of any fungal or bacterial infections of the toenail. Taking care of the toenails regularly will allow you to have a constant check on the health of the toenails, which will help notice any infections at the earliest.

Make an appointment with The Podiatrist is you have any problems.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Happy New Year from The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

happy new year from The Podiatist and your feetnz

We are back.
Hope you all had an enjoyable Holiday.

Do you feet need some tender loving care?
Cracked heels?
Sore feet?
Footwear advice?
Verruccaes?
Corns?
Calluses?
Ingrown toenails?
Arch pain?
Heel pain?

Make an appointment today.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Ingrown toenails

 

 

 

 

Not the most glamorous injury, but ingrown toenails are easily one of the more common and painful foot problems around.

Also known as onychocryptosis, there are a variety of ways an athlete could suffer from the problem.

Excessive pressure on the outside of the great toe, stubbing or having a toe stepped on, tight socks and shoes, even improper trimming of your nails can cause ingrown toenails.

The pain isn’t easy to deal with, as a soccer player is usually always on their feet.

With rugby, soccer, netball and tennis being a dynamic sport of rapid acceleration and changes in direction, kicking a ball, or landing on the toes with an ingrown toenail can be incredibly painful.

Along with soreness and sensitivity along the margins of the toenails, bacteria and fungi can easily infect the skin.

The foot’s warm and moist environment is a great breeding ground for a variety of infections.

The Podiatrist can treat an infected ingrown toenail immediately. Signs include a discoloured toe with discharge (watery, blood, pus). Any attempts at “home surgery” should not be attempted.

To prevent ingrown toenails, you want to protect the feet from trauma, avoid poorly fitting socks and shoes (too tight or too loose), and always make sure to trim your nails straight across with clippers to a comfortable length on a regular basis.

If uninfected, treat the feet by soaking them in either salt or warm soapy water. Drying them thoroughly, applying a mild antiseptic solution, and bandaging the toe will make a difference.

 

Visit The Podiatrist (www.thepodiatrist.co.nz)