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Keep those feet happy | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

foot-care

The importance of our feet has been understood for centuries. Even the Greek philosopher Socrates is reputed to have said, “To him whose feet hurt, everything hurts.” So, what comprises foot care that promotes comfort at any age?

  • Wear shoes and socks that fit and are comfortable.
  • Be sure your toes are not cramped.
  • Change socks daily and if possible have two pairs of shoes in everyday use so that you can alternate the pairs daily.
  • Elastic laces are handy if your feet swell.

Shoes should be worn that cover, protect, provide stability for the foot and minimize the chance of falls.

Whatever your age – student or grandparent – foot care is important.

  • Remember to cut or file your nails straight across and never shorter than the end of your toe.
  • If you are older, and particularly if you are diabetic, it is helpful to get The Podiatrist to do your foot care.
  • It is best to wash feet daily and always test the water’s temperature beforehand. Pat, do not rub, your feet dry and remember to dry between and under the toes. If your feet are bothering you you’ll find that short soaks of even ten minutes are soothing.
  • Use a lanolin (ointment base) moisturizing cream for dry and cracked skin. If your feet perspire, dust lightly with talcum powder. Remember to remove excess cream of powder from between your toes to avoid skin problems. If you are diabetic it is wise to examine your feet daily.
  • Exercise each day if possible. Walking is always good but there are also special foot exercises that can be done like rolling your feet over a rolling pin several times daily or picking up a crumpled towel with your toes.

Despite reasonable care throughout life, however, the older foot is subject to problems. Heredity is a factor as are the stresses over the years and complications from systemic diseases. It has been estimated that at least 80 percent of people over 50 have at least one foot problem.

The most common are corns and calluses, ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, strained arches, heel pain and arthritis including gout.

In many cases there can be improvements jus by switching shoes to the type with wider, box-type toes. Also. shoe size can actually change with added years.

Feet carry our body’s weight, help hold us erect, co-ordinate and maintain balance in walking. We need to give them tender, loving and skilled care.

The returns are high, including the joy of a walk.

Make an appointment with The Podiatrist today.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

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Summer Foot Care Basics and Tips

Image

Ok so now that summer is officially in full swing (well kind of) it may be time to actually take some time to pamper those little puppies walking around in flip-flops and going bare in the sand.  Not only are your feet much more visible than they are in other seasons during the hot summer months, but they can also suffer more from increased walking and from less than supportive shoes.

This being the case, it might be a good time to think about giving your feet a little R and R.

Basic foot care involves some, well, basic tips. 

First of all it is important to wash your feet every day in order to insure that bacteria and fungus don’t get a chance to grow.  Even when you are not showering, you should take the time therefore to wash your feet.  This is even more important when walking around in flip flops or sporting bare feet on the beach because your feet will be exposed to a great deal more of these unpleasant germs. 

Always be sure to wash between the toes as well as over the foot itself. You also should avoid trimming or shaving off calluses no matter how tempting that little shaver at the pedicurists might be.  While your feet may be smoother than ever for a few days, thick layers of dry skin will grow back and you may be exposing yourself to a risk of infection.

Consult The Podiatrist if you are having trouble with stubborn corns and calluses.
Always wear shoes that fit properly. Walking around in tight fighting shoes will leave you at least hobbling. Because your feet swell and sweat in the heat, shoes without socks can become especially uncomfortable as your feet slip and rub against the shoe.  Make sure you have broken in your shoes before taking a long walk and make sure that they fit before buying them.  No matter how cute that little pair of ballet flats might be, if they don’t have your size then do let them go.

Tips on how to take care of our feet during these hot and sticky summer months.

It’s easy to forget that feet can get sunburned. Be sure to apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 50 when barefoot or if feet are exposed through open sandals, and don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet. 

With sandals and open shoe styles, feet are exposed to the elements. Dry, cracked heels are common during the summer months so make an effort to moisturize daily. The Gehwol Fussfraft foot care range have a balm for every skin type.

Keep Feet Clean: Foot perspiration is typical in the summer and can lead to fungal infection and unwanted odor. Wash feet daily, and let them dry thoroughly before putting shoes on. Also, consider using a foot powder to minimize odour. Why not try the Gehwol Herb Bath Salts, and use the Gehwol Fussfraft Mint balm- ideal for cooling the feet.

Add Cushion: When wearing high heels, your feet are feeling the pressure. Cushion the impact with an insole like Podsoft Foot Angles.

Sandals and jandals: with warmer weather, people tend to be more active and on their feet. To relieve tired, achy feet add extra support in your shoes. The Vasyli range of medical sandals are ideal for the summer.

Having perfectly manicured toes can make for a nice beach time public display but if you forget to follow these basic guidelines your feet will be more disaster than delight.  Remember always that your feet are important so to treat your them to a little basic pampering every day.

If you have any concerns, please feel free to contact us.

 

The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Get started on resolving your foot problem today.

How to Prevent Foot Issues Caused by Running.4 Common Foot Ailments Runners Can Prevent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running is one of the best ways to tone the lower body and lose weight, but it can happen at the expense of your poor feet. Aside from sore feet, here are four common foot issues runners often experience.

Black Toenails

What it is: When sneakers don’t fit well, feet may slide forward with each step. This constant tapping injures the toenail, making it bleed underneath, also known as subungual hematoma. It can cause pain and eventually loss of the nail.

How to prevent it: Ensure that your sneakers fit properly — not too snug and not too loose. There should be about a thumbs-width distance between your big toe and the end of the shoe, without the heels sliding up and down. Keeping your toenails trimmed can also prevent this issue, so there’s an excuse to treat yourself to a visit to The Podiatrist!

 

Plantar Fasciitis

What it is: One of the most common causes of heel pain, this frequent issue for newbie runners affects women more than men. The plantar fascia is the flat ligament that connects your heel bone to your toes. If it gets stretched too far and tears, it causes inflammation making every footstep, or even just standing, painful.

How to prevent it: Pronation (when feet roll inward), high arches, and flat feet are prone to this condition, so find a pair of sneakers that supports your specific type of foot. Don’t try to save money by wearing shoes longer than recommended, as this can lead to heel pain as well. Running extremely long distances on hard surfaces like pavement can also cause plantar fasciitis, so when training for a big race, up your mileage .

Keep reading to learn how to prevent two other foot issues that plague runners.

 

Blisters

What they are: The skin on your feet may be thick and tough, but when exposed to constant friction, moisture, and heat, fluid collects between the top and bottom layers of the skin. The fluid in a blister actually acts as a cushion, but can be very painful if it breaks open, and possibly lead to an infection.

How to prevent it: Make sure your sneakers fit well and although wearing new sneaks almost always means dealing with a blister, it can be prevented by breaking in your sneakers gradually over a few weeks. Walk around in them first, and when you start running with them, keep it to shorter distances. Always wear good quality wicking socks to absorb sweat and prevent getting your feet wet by avoiding puddles. If you notice a blister starting to form, apply a band-aid or piece of tape on the area to prevent further irritation. We also have a fantastic sports cream from Gehwol that prevents blisters from forming. I used it while doing the NYC Marathon last year and did not get 1 single blister.

 

Heel Fissures

What it is: When the skin on feet becomes extremely dry, the constant pounding of running can cause it to crack — also known as a heel fissure. If the crack is deep enough, it can bleed and put you at risk for an infection.

How to prevent it: If feet are dry, use a pumice stone in the shower to gently slough off dead skin cells, and then follow up with a thick moisturizer. When not running, avoid wearing shoes that expose your skin (like sandals), as this can dry the skin out even more.

Make a visit to The Podiatrist for expert care for your feet and see our range of foot care products.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Keeping children on their feet – when should you seek assistance?

  • You first notice a problem with your child’s feet.
  • A relative or friend makes comment about your child’s feet.
  • Your child complains of tired or sore feet or legs.
  • Your child is not walking by the age of 18 months.
  • Your child wants to be carried most of the time.

As registered podiatrists in Auckland, New Zealand we believe our parents and little patients deserve to have the information needed to make good choices about their foot and ankle care.

Caron Orelowitz – Podiatrist

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

Summer Foot Care Basics and Tips

Image

Ok so now that summer is officially in full swing (well kind of) it may be time to actually take some time to pamper those little puppies walking around in flip-flops and going bare in the sand.  Not only are your feet much more visible than they are in other seasons during the hot summer months, but they can also suffer more from increased walking and from less than supportive footwear.  This being the case, it might be a good time to think about giving your feet a little R and R.

Basic foot care involves some, well, basic tips.  First of all it is important to wash your feet every day in order to insure that bacteria and fungus don’t get a chance to grow.  Even when you are not showering, you should take the time therefore to wash your feet.  This is even more important when walking around in flip flops or sporting bare feet on the beach because your feet will be exposed to a great deal more of these unpleasant germs.  Always be sure to wash between the toes as well as over the foot itself.

You also should avoid trimming or shaving off calluses no matter how tempting that little shaver at the pedicurists might be.  While your feet may be smoother than ever for a few days, thick layers of dry skin will grow back and you may be exposing yourself to a risk of infection.  Consult a doctor if you are having trouble with stubborn corns and calluses.

Always wear shoes that fit properly.  Walking around in the heat of the sun in tight fighting shoes will leave you running, or at least hobbling. Because your feet swell and sweat in the heat, shoes without socks can become especially uncomfortable as your feet slip and rub against the shoe.  Make sure you have broken in your shoes before taking a long walk and make sure that they fit before buying them.  No matter how cute that little pair of ballet flats might be, if they don’t have your size then do let them go.

Tips on how to take care of our feet during these hot and sticky summer months.
           

Apply Sunscreen:

It’s easy to forget that feet can get sunburned. Be sure to apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 50 when barefoot or if feet are exposed through open sandals, and don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet. 

Moisturize:

With sandals and open shoe styles, feet are exposed to the elements. Dry, cracked heels are common during the summer months so make an effort to moisturize daily. The Gehwol Fussfraft foot care range have a balm for every skin type.

Keep Feet Clean:

Foot perspiration is typical in the summer and can lead to fungal infection and unwanted odor. Wash feet daily, and let them dry thoroughly before putting shoes on. Also, consider using a foot powder to minimize odour. Why not try the Gehwol Herb Bath Salts, and use the Gehwol Fussfraft Mint balm– ideal for cooling the feet.

Add Cushion:

When wearing high heels, your feet are feeling the pressure. Cushion the impact with an insole like Podsoft Foot Angles

 Sandals and jandals:

With warmer weather, people tend to be more active and on their feet. To relieve tired, achy feet add extra support in your shoes. The Vasyli range of medical sandals are ideal for the summer.

Having perfectly manicured toes can make for a nice beach time public display but if you forget to follow these basic guidelines your feet will be more disaster than delight.  Remember always that your feet are important so to treat your them to a little basic pampering every day.

If you have any concerns, please feel free to contact us.

 

The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Heading off for a break from the cold? Some tips to keep your feet healthy

For many of you who are heading away for the school holidays for some warmth, the thought if warmer weather is an  invitation to declare freedom for your feet.

That means out with bulky shoes and in with less-supportive flip-flops,  sandals and clogs. Those people may be left feeling more footloose and fancy  free, but they also may pay the price later.

Podiatrists have been warning patients for years about  the harm they were doing to their feet and lower legs by wearing flimsy  footwear. Warnings that were once based on anecdotes, though, now have more  scientific evidence to support them.

At least one key researcher’s interest in studying the effects of wearing  flip-flops and similar footwear was fueled by their growing popularity on  college campuses.

“They’re not made to walk around in all day,” said Justin Shroyer, who was  working on his graduate degree at Auburn University at the time. “They’re for  wearing to the beach so you don’t have to walk on the hot blazing pavement  between your car and the sand.”

Flip-flops significantly shortened their stride and how long their feet were  in contact with the ground compared with sneakers. Further, flip-flops tended to  reduce how much the top part of the swinging foot flicks up toward the shin.

Shroyer speculates that the shorter steps and lessened foot motion are  consequences of the wearers’ efforts to keep the flip-flops on their feet as  they walk. People tend to grip the base with their toes to keep their flip-flops  from flip-flopping off. That downward exertion, however, conflicts with the  foot’s propensity to rise at the front to shift the ground strike to the  heel.

Shroyer thinks that tug-of-war puts extra pressure on the tibial anterior,  the muscle at the front of the shin, and leads to the soreness that some  attribute to long-term flip-flop wear

“If you had a normal workout in the winter and then went into the gym and  worked overtime on the muscle, you’re going to be sore,” said Shroyer, who  published the study in a 2010 edition of the Journal of the American Podiatric  Medical Association.

Another problem is that flip-flops, sandals and their ilk offer little shock  absorption. And many people continue to wear their flip-flops after  the padding  has been squashed.

Flat footwear can lead to foot fractures from  repeated stress on the arch of the foot.

There’s at least one  benefit of flip-flops: They help shield your feet from  burning sand and pavement and from other hazards, such as germs on a shower  floor, she said. She suggests choosing a flip-flop that bends only in the front,  has lots of cushioning in the arch and isn’t so high that they pose a risk of  slipping out of them to the side.

Summer holiday footwear tips

– Wear comfortable shoes to the airport. You never know how long you will  wait in line, how far you will walk to the terminal, or if you will have to make  a mad dash to make a connecting flight. Loose-fitting flip-flops and sandals  increase your risk of tripping, falling and spraining your ankle.

– Avoid taking new shoes on vacation. They can be stiff and unforgiving. If  you plan to dance the night away or do a lot of walking, wear shoes that will  make your feet as happy as you are.

– Take flip-flops or sandals, particularly to avoid walking barefoot in  locker rooms and around pools, where you may pick up athlete’s foot, a plantar  wart infection or toenail fungus.

– Pack an antifungal cream or powder. If you’re staying in a hotel or using  public pools, using an antifungal product can help prevent athlete’s foot.

– If you are traveling more than two hours, be sure to stretch your legs and  pump your feet. This will help circulate the blood to prevent deep vein  thrombosis or dangerous blood clots in the legs.

– Pack a small first-aid kit. Chances are you’ll develop a blister from that  long walk through the shopping village or scrape your foot on a piece of coral  at the beach. Clean your feet with saline (eye solution), apply a small amount  of antibiotic cream and cover with a Band-Aid or gauze.

The highs and lows of stilettos-Could this shoe ruin your health?

Stiletto heels seem to be the unreasonable fashion trend that simply will not go away.

It is no secret that women have been enjoying high heels for a long time. Now that the heels are becoming even higher and thinner, women seem to love them more and more. This trend will never stop.

High fashion

Anybody who is into fashion would wear them.

But why? Don’t they hurt? “Oh, absolutely,”. “They wear them because of how they look.”

Stilettos make a woman look great, according to a lecturer from East StroudsburgUniversity

“They are alluring to men and make your legs appear longer,” she said, warning, though, that women
wearing stilettos should use their abdominal muscles more in order to maintain good posture.

Trendy toes

Stilettos are used in many styles. Some have platforms and others are flat, but the flat ones are more fashionable now. Some have closed toes and some are the strappy sandal types. Shoes with stiletto heels are now even worn for casual wear.

The heels range from about three inches to a towering nine inches or more.

Some people change into them at work and then kick them off when they are sitting at their desks. They put them on only when they have to get up and look wonderful.

A Podiatrist’s view

Stiletto heels are very bad. Anything above a two-inch heel is bad for the feet.

Not only do stilettos change a woman’s posture, but the thinness of the heel affects her stability. With the thinner heel, you are more likely to sprain an ankle.

High heels with platforms are even more dangerous than the stilettos with flat fronts. They are worse for the stability because the front of the foot is not on the ground.

Stilettos can hurt your feet permanently.

Among other things, they can cause hammertoes. This condition causes the toes to contract and stay contracted.

The price of beauty

The shoes could also cause bunions, the bump on the side of the big toe caused by the tightness of the shoe. Once (hammertoes and bunions) form, which could happen in as little as a couple of years, they are there permanently. The stilettos could also cause knee, back and hip problems.

Heels could also cause corns and calluses, toenail problems, a shortening of the Achilles tendon, Haglund’s deformity (inflammation of the bony enlargement on the back of your heel), neuromas (“a neuroma causes a sharp, burning pain on the ball of your foot and stinging or numbness in your toes”), joint pain in the ball of your foot, and stress fractures.

Feet are damaged as a result of the wrong shoes.

To keep feet healthy, people should look for a sneaker-type shoe with plenty of room in the toe.