Blog Archives

Plantar warts

Plantar warts are different from most other warts. They tend to be flat and cause the build up of callus (that has to be peeled away before the plantar wart itself can be seen. Plantar warts may attack blood vessels deep in the skin. They can be quite painful. Plantar warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) type 1 and tend to affect teenagers.

By contrast, common warts on the skin of the fingers and hands appear as little mounds of overgrown skin with a rough dry surface. They do not as a rule grow down much and they do not tend to hurt. They are usually caused by HPV types 2 and 4 and by preference affect young children before their teens

To avoid plantar warts, a child should be taught never to wear someone else’s shoes. If a child gets plantar warts, they should be treated by The Podiatrist. Plantar warts can be far more of a problem than common warts.

  • Unless you’re strolling on a sandy beach, don’t walk barefoot.
  • Put on a fresh pair of socks each day, and alternate shoes each day.
  • Make sure your feet are always dry and clean.
  • Inspect your child’s feet regularly.
  • Do not touch warts on another person or on another part of the body.
  • Pay attention to unusual growths on the skin. Seek prompt medical attention if you find any.

See The Podiatrist for all your foot care needs.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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5 Easy Tips for Managing Chronic Foot Pain

Foot pain should not be a part of your daily life. There is a way to manage chronic foot pain without resorting to drastic measures such as surgery.

You may have foot pain from growths such as plantar warts, corns or calluses. Your foot pain may also stem from wearing ill-fitting shoes or from standing on your feet all day. Fortunately, foot pain relief can be achieved at home.

Buy shoes that fit. Always try on shoes before you purchase them. If the shoe is too tight across the toe box, it will be very unpleasant to wear and will make foot pain worse. Ill-fitting shoes also cause blisters or corns on your feet. You may want to get your feet measured each time you try on shoes, as some brands fit differently than others. Your feet swell as the day goes on, so it is usually best to wait until the evening to try on and purchase shoes.

Choose shoes based on activity. If you are going for a run, wear sneakers designed for running, not walking. You use your feet differently based on what type of exercise you perform. The shoes you wear need to be designed for that activity.

Support your arches. Different people have different shapes of foot arch. For example, you may have a low arch or be flat footed. That means your entire foot touches the ground when you stand. A high arch is the opposite of flat feet. Only your heels and toes have contact with the ground.
Both types of arches need support if they cause you pain. Wear inserts in your shoes that are designed for your arch type.

Massage your feet. At the end of the day, give your feet a massage to help calm tired muscles and reduce stress and tension in your feet. Take a seat in a comfortable chair and prop one foot up on the knee of your opposite leg. Rub the foot gently. Try stretching your toes by pulling on them individually with your fingers.

Prop your feet up. Rest your feet after a long day. Sit down and elevate your feet at a 45 degree angle. Elevating your feet will help the blood flow away from them and will reduce swelling and tenderness.

Kick chronic foot pain to the curb with any one of these simple remedies. With the right shoes and some relaxation, foot pain relief can be at your doorstep.

 

See The Podiatrist if you have any problems.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Heading off for a break from the cold? Some tips to keep your feet healthy

For many of you who are heading away for the school holidays for some warmth, the thought if warmer weather is an  invitation to declare freedom for your feet.

That means out with bulky shoes and in with less-supportive flip-flops,  sandals and clogs. Those people may be left feeling more footloose and fancy  free, but they also may pay the price later.

Podiatrists have been warning patients for years about  the harm they were doing to their feet and lower legs by wearing flimsy  footwear. Warnings that were once based on anecdotes, though, now have more  scientific evidence to support them.

At least one key researcher’s interest in studying the effects of wearing  flip-flops and similar footwear was fueled by their growing popularity on  college campuses.

“They’re not made to walk around in all day,” said Justin Shroyer, who was  working on his graduate degree at Auburn University at the time. “They’re for  wearing to the beach so you don’t have to walk on the hot blazing pavement  between your car and the sand.”

Flip-flops significantly shortened their stride and how long their feet were  in contact with the ground compared with sneakers. Further, flip-flops tended to  reduce how much the top part of the swinging foot flicks up toward the shin.

Shroyer speculates that the shorter steps and lessened foot motion are  consequences of the wearers’ efforts to keep the flip-flops on their feet as  they walk. People tend to grip the base with their toes to keep their flip-flops  from flip-flopping off. That downward exertion, however, conflicts with the  foot’s propensity to rise at the front to shift the ground strike to the  heel.

Shroyer thinks that tug-of-war puts extra pressure on the tibial anterior,  the muscle at the front of the shin, and leads to the soreness that some  attribute to long-term flip-flop wear

“If you had a normal workout in the winter and then went into the gym and  worked overtime on the muscle, you’re going to be sore,” said Shroyer, who  published the study in a 2010 edition of the Journal of the American Podiatric  Medical Association.

Another problem is that flip-flops, sandals and their ilk offer little shock  absorption. And many people continue to wear their flip-flops after  the padding  has been squashed.

Flat footwear can lead to foot fractures from  repeated stress on the arch of the foot.

There’s at least one  benefit of flip-flops: They help shield your feet from  burning sand and pavement and from other hazards, such as germs on a shower  floor, she said. She suggests choosing a flip-flop that bends only in the front,  has lots of cushioning in the arch and isn’t so high that they pose a risk of  slipping out of them to the side.

Summer holiday footwear tips

– Wear comfortable shoes to the airport. You never know how long you will  wait in line, how far you will walk to the terminal, or if you will have to make  a mad dash to make a connecting flight. Loose-fitting flip-flops and sandals  increase your risk of tripping, falling and spraining your ankle.

– Avoid taking new shoes on vacation. They can be stiff and unforgiving. If  you plan to dance the night away or do a lot of walking, wear shoes that will  make your feet as happy as you are.

– Take flip-flops or sandals, particularly to avoid walking barefoot in  locker rooms and around pools, where you may pick up athlete’s foot, a plantar  wart infection or toenail fungus.

– Pack an antifungal cream or powder. If you’re staying in a hotel or using  public pools, using an antifungal product can help prevent athlete’s foot.

– If you are traveling more than two hours, be sure to stretch your legs and  pump your feet. This will help circulate the blood to prevent deep vein  thrombosis or dangerous blood clots in the legs.

– Pack a small first-aid kit. Chances are you’ll develop a blister from that  long walk through the shopping village or scrape your foot on a piece of coral  at the beach. Clean your feet with saline (eye solution), apply a small amount  of antibiotic cream and cover with a Band-Aid or gauze.