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Shopping for School shoes- again|The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

measuring children's feet is important to ensure the perfect fit

The wrong school shoes could cause bunions, corns, calluses, blisters, clawed toes, heel pain or change the shape and function of a foot.

School shoes would be one of those things that one should consider spending a bit more money on as children spend up to 40 hours a week in them.

More expensive shoes are likely to last a lot longer than the cheaper ones.

Parents of children with flat feet should be particularly careful.

Runners could also provide support, as long as they were fitted properly, Ms Biedak said.

Ballet flats and skater shoes for everyday wear at school is not recommended.

GET IT RIGHT

You would be better off taking your child with you to get school shoes. Shoes need to fit properly. It is not a guessing game, and all makes fit differently. A size and fit in one make is not necessary the same size and fit in another.

TIPS FOR BUYING SCHOOL SHOES

– Measure BOTH feet, as most people will have one foot longer or wider than the other

– Look for soles made from rubber and double-stitching around the toe area, which will give shoes a longer life

– Avoid slip-on shoes

– Avoid second-hand shoes as the worn shoe will have moulded to the shape of the previous wearer and could cause problems for your child’s feet

– It’s best to buy shoes in the late afternoon as children’s feet often swell by the end of the day

– There should be a child’s thumb-width between the end of the shoe and the end of the longest toe

– The widest part of the foot should correspond with the widest part of the shoe

– The fastening mechanism should hold the heel firmly in the back of the shoe

– The sole should not twist

– The heel should be snug but comfortable and the back part of the shoe strong and stable

– Your child should be able to move their toes freely, the shoes shouldn’t hurt and there should be no bulges from the toes on either side of the shoe

THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR

– Children complaining of pain in the feet, heel, knee or legs

– Regular, unexplained tripping or falling

– Uneven shoe wear or one shoe that wears down before the other

– Skin or toenail irritation

 

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YourFeetNZ- The Podiatrist |Tips for purchasing footwear for school

You remember preparing for your first day of school; the shopping, in particular shoe shopping, and the wonder of a pair of brand new sneakers, shoes or even sandals.  Somehow, the experience is very different when, as a parent, you have to be concerned about size and budget, instead of style and colour as your child!

Since parents tend to take advantage of back to school sales, health experts advise that you have to be careful about which shoes and school bags are bought. Shopping for new school shoes is a chore that parents everywhere share, as they prepare their children for school for the first time, or on their return from holidays

Children spend around 30-45 hours a week in their school shoes, or more than 15,000 hours during their school years, so it’s vital that they’re fitted properly. In the first 11 years of a child’s life, feet may grow through approximately 17 shoe sizes, up until they’re 18 years of age. Ill-fitting shoes can lead to problems in adulthood, such as ingrown toenails, corns and bunions, which may even require surgery later in life.

Important Purchasing Advice

• Always have your child’s feet measured before you buy shoes. Children’s feet grow quickly, so you shouldn’t rely on a previous measurement.

• Opt for new shoes, once financially possible, instead of accepting hand-me-downs. That will help ensure a better fit and avoid spreading germs, such as the fungus that causes athlete’s foot.

• Inspect the heels of your child’s shoes for uneven wear, which may indicate a foot problem.

• Don’t buy shoes that aren’t comfortable. There should be no reason to “break in” a new pair of shoes.

It’s no surprise that kids want to be like other kids and wear what their friends are wearing. Even in pre-school, style is important. Still, from mom and dad’s point of view, there is more to shoes than looking good.

These tips will explain why:

• Shoes need to be flexible and able to sustain extreme activity. They should also provide support and cushioning and be breathable, to allow body heat and moisture to escape.

• However, a bad fit can negate all the benefits of a good shoe, so finding the right size is essential. Since shoe sizes tend to vary by manufacturer, an accurate fit can only be assured once the foot is inside the shoe.

• A tip for making sure that the shoe size fits, is measuring the distance between the second toe and the end of the shoe. The second toe is usually the longest.

• Have your child walk around in the shoes to make sure that they don’t hit the ankle bones or have seams that rub against the foot.

• Though it may seem children quickly outgrow their shoes, buying shoes that are too big isn’t a good idea. A loose fit can cause painful calluses and sores, because there is too much movement in the shoe. On the other hand, shoes that are too small can cause an abnormal gait that can misalign growing bones in the feet.

It may be time to get a new pair of shoes if your child begins to complain about shoes that are uncomfortable; be aware, however, that trend conscious youngsters have been known to “need” new shoes because of what the others kids are wearing. Shoes can put a dent in any household budget, so make sure that the shoes fit when you buy them, and before you buy a bigger pair of shoes.

Buy shoes at the end of the day

While you might decide to head out bright and early to get your child’s shoes fitted, bear in mind that it’s best to go during late afternoon. This is because children’s feet often get a little more swollen by the end of the day. That way, you’ll get school shoes fitted when your child’s feet are at their biggest.

Other things to look out for

While you might usually expect to only think about school shoes and your kids’ feet once a year, here’s a checklist of things to look out for, and see a podiatrist/foot health practitioner if necessary:

• Children complaining of pain in the feet, heel, knees or legs

• Unexplained tripping and falling (if it happens regularly)

• Uneven shoe wear, or one shoe that wears down before the other

• Skin or toenail irritation.

Do share this information with your kids who are old enough to appreciate the advice to minimise peer pressure, and ultimately your stress levels … Happy shopping!

Your feet mirror your general health… cherish them!

There is a great range of summer sandals ideal for school and casual wear available from Scooters.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.scooters.net.nz

Tips for Buying Kids’ Shoes

When it comes to buying shoes for your children, there are so many different styles available; it can sometimes be difficult to figure out which one to choose. The most important thing to keep in mind is that your child needs proper foot support during childhood’s critical growth years.

A child’s foot can grow up to about the age of 18, and the most important development happens in the first seven years. Here is a quick look at how fast kids’ feet grow:

—  Under 12 months old, every 2 months.

—  12 months to 2.5 years old, every 3 months.

—  2.5 to 4 years old, every 4 months.

—  From 4 to 6 years old, every 6 months.

Shoes that do not fit properly can be uncomfortable and unhealthy. That is why it is important to always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes. Every shoe fits differently, so do not buy shoes based solely on the size printed on the shoebox. Make sure your child tries on every shoe and watch them as they walk to make sure they seem comfortable and fit properly.

Shoe Buying Tips When you find shoes that you like, hold them in your hand and examine them. The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), experts in foot health and development, recommends you look for the following features:

Flexibility. Typically, the younger the child, the thinner and more flexible the soles should be. The sole should be easily flexible and be able to bend in your hand without effort. It should bend with your child’s toes — where the ball of the foot will be rather than in the middle of the shoe.

Toe room. While your child is standing, you should be able to press about a half inch, roughly a finger’s width, between the longest toe and the front of the shoe. The area of the shoe just below the laces should crease when your baby takes a step.

Materials. The upper part of the shoe should be made of breathable materials such as leather, rather than synthetic materials. The insoles should be cushioned for comfort. Feel around inside the shoe for irregularities in stitching, glue or stapling. Look for a stiff heel cup. Press on both sides of the heel counter. It should not collapse.

To help parents find shoes that fit properly, here are some helpful shoe buying tips:

—  Make sure to see a professional trained in fitting shoes for infants,  toddlers and young

children

—  Have your child’s feet measured every 2 to 3 months until toddler  years, then every 3 to 4

months after that.

—  Feet are seldom precisely the same size. Always buy for the larger foot.

—  Do not buy shoes that need “breaking in.” Shoes should be comfortable from the

beginning. Observe your child walking around in both shoes for longer than a few

minutes. Then, check each foot to make certain there are no irritation marks.

—  Make sure the shoe is not too heavy. A heavy shoe can make your child walk irregularly,

preventing the development of a normal walking pattern.

—  If a child complains of foot pain or discomfort, schedule a check-up with you The

Podiatrist who specializes in children’s foot care.

Tips for Buying Kids’ Shoes

—  Shoes that do not fit properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet

before buying shoes and fit the shoe to the foot.

—  Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child  comfortably does not

mean it will fit another the same way. In  addition, the practice of sharing shoes can

spread fungi like athletes foot and nail fungus.

—  Watch for signs of irritation. Redness is a sure sign that a shoe is too tight or too loose. If

your child always wants to remove one or  both of his/her shoes, this may be an unspoken

sign that the shoes do not fit properly.

—  Examine the heels. When children begin to show in toeing, they may wear through the

heels of their shoes much quicker than outgrowing the shoes themselves. Uneven heel

wear can indicate a foot problem that  should be checked by The Podiatrist.

—  Shop for shoes later in the day. Feet tend to swell during the day, so take your children

shoe shopping when their feet are swollen, to ensure they’ll get the proper fit for all day

comfort.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

Make sure the shoe fits

 

 

 

CHOOSING the right shoe for school for Winter is important for growing feet, but often the choice is complicated by a preference for fashion over function.

All the kids want is what is in fashion, but they’re just not right for school, and are often not suitable for the wet weather.

Mums don’t mind spending the dollars but in choosing the right shoe, they need to be aware of fit, length and width as well as style. Children spend many hours a day in these shoes so they (shoes) need to be sturdy and durable.

If you buy a cheap synthetic shoe you’ll increase the likelihood of tinea (athletes foot) which rises massively in closed-in shoes and wet weather.

When buying, look at the breathability. Leather and mesh are always better options.

Ask your footwear provider to make certain that what you are buying is appropriate- after all, they are the experts.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz

 

How to Buy Children’s Shoes

A well-made shoe that fits right is not only more comfortable for your children, but can help them avoid injury. Do you know what features you should look for in your child’s footwear?

A pair of well-made shoes can keep children safe from foot problems such as sprains and strains, both in class and on the playground

Here are some tips for how to buy children’s shoes.

  • Children’s feet change with age. Shoe and sock size may change every few months as a child’s feet grow. Shoes that don’t fit      properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes, and watch for signs of irritation.
  • Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn’t mean it will fit another the same way. Also, sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete’s foot and nail fungus.
  • Examine the heels. Children may wear through the heels of shoes quicker than outgrowing shoes themselves. Uneven heel wear can indicate a foot problem that should be checked by a podiatrist.
  • Take your child shoe shopping. Every shoe fits differently. Letting a child have a say in the shoe buying process promotes healthy foot habits down the road.
  • Always buy for the larger foot. Feet are seldom precisely the same size. Buy shoes that do not need a “break-in” period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. Also make sure to have your child try on shoes with socks or tights, if that’s how they’ll be worn

Tips for Buying Children’s Athletic Footwear.

A child’s court shoe:

  • should support both sides of the foot, due to the quick lateral movements and weight shifts in court sports; and
  • provide a flexible sole for fast changes of direction.

A child’s running shoe:

  • should provide maximum shock absorption to help runners avoid ailments such as shin splints and knee pain; and
  • control the way your child’s heel strikes the ground, so the rest of the foot can fall correctly.

Athletic socks:

  • should be made of a natural/synthetic blend, as this helps “wick” away moisture best; and
  • not contain any large seams that can cause blisters or irritation.

Visit The Podiatrist if you have any questions.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz