Blog Archives

Kids- their feet and shoes | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

childrens orthoses are not like adults

If you have active kids, making sure they’re wearing the right shoes for what they’re doing, and for their own unique physique, can be as important and wearing their retainers or washing their faces.

  • One in three children who plays a team sport is injured seriously enough to miss practice or games.
  • Children’s bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments are still growing, making them more susceptible to injury.

When it comes to issues of our kids’ we need to know to keep them safe, and help them understand how to do things right.

A few things we can do, and remind them to do, include:

  • Kids should have at least one or two days off from any particular sport each week to avoid overuse injuries.
  • If you experience a foot or ankle injury while playing sports, early attention is key to preventing further damage. Always ice the injury, never use heat.
  • Choose footwear specific to your activity. Sneakers made for tennis players will provide different support and traction than cleats made for football players.
  • If you participate in a certain sport at least two to three times a week, you should wear a sport-specific shoe.
  • Go to a store that specializes in athletic shoes, or The Podiatrist for suggestions.
  • Be sure to have their feet measured every time you purchase new shoes, as feet size and shape can change (especially in kids) as we age.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Advertisements

Foot Health | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

Summer-feet-1

Foot and ankle concerns are too often overlooked by the general public. Our feet are the foundation of our body.

Examining our feet can help us identify early symptoms of other serious disorders such as vascular disease and diabetes.

Foot issues can also cause other problems throughout our body.

Normal changes to the foot as we age include:

  • The foot becomes wider and longer
  • There is mild settling of the arch which is seen as flattening of the foot
  • The fat pad on the bottom of the heel thins out, causing loss of natural padding and spring in the step
  • The foot and ankle lose some of their normal range of motion and become stiffer
  • There can be some loss of balance while walking

As these physical changes occur, shoe sizes and support needs also change and must be addressed.

Some foot changes can occur that are abnormal or pathological. These problems do not happen naturally and many can be prevented, or their progress halted, by addressing ill-fitting shoes, adding supportive orthotics, surgery, or other modifications.

Abnormal changes to the foot include:

  • Bunions (the formation of a large bump on the big toe, which starts to point toward the little toes)
  • Hammering of the toes (curling of the toes)
  • Clawing of the toes (more severe curling of the toes)
  • Tailor’s bunion (the formation of a large bump on the smallest toe, which starts to point toward the large toe)
  • Calluses or corns, which occur on the toes or foot due to high pressure over bony areas
  • Morton’s neuromas (“pinched nerve” between the toes)
  • Arthritis of the joints

Early detection and treatment of problems help keep individuals on their feet and active.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Taking care of your feet is not child’s play

A day in the sun can end with a day at the doctor’s office if the proper safety measures are ignored. Before children catch a glimpse of the giant slide at the pool, the oversized toys at the park or the exciting rides at the amusement park, prepare them with the right footwear and protect them with the right care.

– Carefully observe your child’s walking patterns. Does your child have toes that point in or out, have knock-knees or other gait abnormalities? These problems can be corrected if they are detected early and treated by aThe Podiatrist.

– Children’s feet change size rapidly, so always have your child’s feet measured each time you purchase new shoes.

– When shopping for shoes, look for stiff material on either side of the heel, adequate cushioning and a built-in arch. The shoe should bend at the ball of the foot, not in the middle of the shoe. Never wear hand-me-down shoes.

– Limit the time children wear platform or heeled shoes and alternate with good quality sneakers or flat shoes. High-tops generally help prevent ankle sprains.

– Don’t buy shoes that need a “break-in” period. Good shoes should feel comfortable right away. For athletic activities, choose a shoe that is designed for the sport your child will be playing.

– Never pack brand-new shoes for your children to wear on vacation.

– Walking barefoot on pavement, hotel or airplane carpeting, in hotel bathrooms or a locker room and near the pool can make your child susceptible to a host of infections. Always wear a pair of flip-flops or strappy sandals made of soft, supple leather to prevent contracting a bacteria or fungus like athlete’s foot or plantar warts.

– When applying sunscreen, don’t forget to put some on your child’s feet. Additionally, always remember to re-apply.

– Lack of complaints by a youngster is not a reliable sign. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware.

– Be careful about applying home remedies to children’s feet. Preparations strong enough to kill certain types of fungus can harm the skin.

Your best bet is to visit The Podiatrist.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

www.scooters.net.nz