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Southern Cross Easy-Claims| The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

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Easy-claim

Southern Cross Health Society Easy-claim (“Easy-claim”) is a convenient way for Southern Cross members to claim for eligible healthcare services at the time of purchase, without completing a claim form.

How to use Easy-claim

You can use Easy-claim at The Podiatrist. Simply present your Member card or your app at the counter when you are purchasing eligible healthcare products and services.

If your plan covers the product or service and it qualifies, we’ll reimburse the provider directly and you’ll only pay any remaining contribution you’re responsible for, so you don’t have to worry about filling out claim forms or waiting for a refund.*

For all your foot problems- call The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Tel: (09) 550 6325

 

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Pediatric Heel Pain- Heel pain in Children

Children are resilient, but when your child begins to complain about heel pain, this must be taken seriously. Heel pain in a child is not normal. There are different causes of heel pain in a child and an adequate physical exam can help determine which type of heel pain is affecting your child.

 

What Is Calcaneal Apophysitis?

The most common cause of pediatric heel pain is calcaneal apophysitis (an injury or irritation to the growth plate of the heel). Typically, this occurs in boys (and girs) between the ages of 8 and 13 who are fairly active children. This is most likely to occur with a rapid increase in activity after a period of rest – such as starting rugby, soccer, netball and any in fact and sport practice after being off for a peiod of time.

Are There Other Causes of Pediatric Heel Pain?

Yes. Calcaneal apophysitis is the most common cause of pediatric heel pain. However, there are other things that can cause the heels to hurt such as stress fractures, growth plate fractures and hematagenous osteomyelitis, an infection of the heel bone.

Causes of Calcaneal Apophysitis

Causes of pediatric heel pain include:

  • Rapid increase in physical activity (sports)
  • Changes in training surfaces
  • Changes in training techniques
  • Changes in shoe gear (or going barefoot) while being physically active
  • A rapid increase in growth over a short period of time

During periods of rapid growth, the bones of the leg grow faster than the soft tissues (muscles, tendons and ligaments) and the stress they place across the growth plate can cause pain and inflammation.

Symptoms of Calcaneal Apophysitis

Calcaneal apophysitis typically affects active boys and girls between the ages of 8 and 13; however, this condition can affect any active child. Early signs and symptoms include:

  • Limping
  • Inability to participate in athletic activities
  • Walking on the toes to keep the heel from touching the ground
  • Pain in the heel that is worse after activity and relieved by resting

Diagnosis

The Podiatrist will start your exam with a thorough history. This will be followed by a physical exam. During your physical exam, The Podiatrist:

  • Pain and tenderness to the area of the inflamed growth plate
  • A tight heel cord (Achilles tendon)
  • Overall foot structure
  • Abnormalities in gait

X-rays may be ordered to detect any underlying bone abnormalities.

Treatment

Calcaneal apophysitis can be easily treated with changes in shoe gear, resting, icing, stretching and anti-inflammatory medications. Sometimes, physical therapy may be necessary, but this is rare.

Many times these types of injuries are unavoidable, but proper athletic shoes, stretching exercises and avoidance of obesity are some of the ways one can prevent an injury to the growth plate.

See The Podiatrist for expert care.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

 

 

A parent’s guide to foot health for athletic kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the Olympics approaching in July, you can expect to witness some amazing feats of athleticism this summer. But Olympic athletes won’t be the only ones competing hard in sports – so will your kids.

Millions of children worldwide will participate in sports this year, from softball to soccer and swimming to cycling. No matter what their sport or whether they play competitively or just for fun, they will have one important thing in common: They’ll need their feet to be pain-free if they’re going to play their best and prevent injuries.

Sports play a significant role in the lives of millions of young athletes. Parents need to be aware that sports, which require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries. Protecting children’s feet from injuries, and bringing them to a podiatrist when problems occur, can help keep kids in the game and make the sport more enjoyable.

Some tips for helping protect children’s feet while playing sports:

* Protective taping of the ankles is often necessary to help prevent sprains or fractures.

* Buying a shoe designed for the specific sport your child plays not only improves your child’s performance in the sport, it also can help protect him or her from serious foot and ankle injuries.

* Without the right sock, even the best athletic shoe won’t score points-on the field or off. Athletic socks should consist of a natural/synthetic blend, which is best at wicking away moisture and minimizing foot odour. Socks should not have large seams that might cause blisters or irritation.

Commonly played sports and the risks associated with them include:

* Netball and Basketball – Children playing basketball may be at risk for ankle sprains, tendinitis and plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the thick band of tissue on the sole of the foot). To minimize the risk of foot injury, choose a shoe with a thick, stiff sole, high ankle support and shock absorption.

* Tennis – The rapid, repetitive lateral movements and shifting of weight required of tennis players can lead to injuries such as ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis and corns or calluses. Tennis players will do best with a flexible-soled shoe that supports both sides of the foot.

* Running – Movements required of runners include leg extension and hitting the balls of the feet with a great deal of force. Running can lead to shin splints, heel pain and blisters. A good running shoe should offer good support and shock absorption. In some cases, custom orthotics may be necessary to provide additional support and control of foot motion.

* Rugby and Soccer – The running, jumping and lateral movements required of rugby and soccer players can lead to many foot injuries, with heel pain and shin splints being among the most common. Rugby and soccer boots should provide multiple cleats in the heel area and enough room for thick .

Sports-related foot and ankle injuries are on the rise as more children participate actively in sports. Parents need to be vigilant to ensure children’s feet remain healthy and safe. And remember – lack of complaint by a child is not a reliable sign that everything is fine. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.

Ensuring your child’s feet stay healthy could go a long way – your young athlete could one day be the next superstar athlete. If your child participates in strenuous sports, monitor his or her foot health closely. If you suspect a problem, take your child to The Podiatrist for evaluation and treatment

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

‘Growing Pains,’ Is There Actually Such A Thing?

Parents frequently hear their children complain of aches and pains that affect their lower extremities. Some parents and even pediatricians attribute that to “growing pains.” But is there such a thing as growing pains? In this article we will take a look at some conditions that affect lower extremities in kids.

Sever’s Apophysitis

Sever’s apophysitis is a condition that affects children of the ages 8-14. Boys are more commonly affected than girls. Typical symptoms include pain in the back of the heel, which is worse with and after activities. The affected foot does not normally look any different than the unaffected foot. There is no noticeable swelling or bruising. X-rays also do not show any visible pathology.

Clinically, the patient will complain of pain when the heel bone is squeezed. Normally there is no history of trauma, however, trauma can also trigger this painful condition. Predisposing factors include high level of athletic involvement (doing more than one sport at a time), body weight, tightness of the calf muscles, flat feet and improper shoes (flip flops or flats).

Although Sever’s apophysitis is self-limiting, meaning that it eventually resolves by itself, it is best to have it evaluated and treated, as it may take a long time (months and, in some cases, years) until the symptoms go away.

Due to the intensity of symptoms, aggressive treatment is recommended and includes modification of activities, rest, ice, massage , anti-inflammatory medications, heel lifts in shoes, custom orthotics (inserts in shoes), calf stretches, and physical therapy. In severe cases, cast immobilization for 2-4 weeks is helpful. Overall, the prognosis for Sever’s apophysitis is excellent.

Iselin’s Disease

Iselin’s disease is inflammation of the growth plate of the fifth metatarsal base. Just like Sever’s apophysitis, Iselin’s affects physically-active children between ages of 8 and 14.

The most common sports leading to this condition include soccer, gymnastics, dance and basketball. Iselin’s apophysitis is an overuse condition of the base
of the fifth metatarsal. Tight calf muscles, high arch and flat foot type are predisposing factors.

Your child will complain of pain along the outer edge of the foot that is worse with activity and improves with rest. He/she may limp or walk on the inside of the foot.

The growth center may be enlarged, red, and painful to the touch as compared to the other side.

Treatments are similar to those of Sever’s apophysitis: modification of activities, ice, anti-inflammatory medications, custom orthotics, calf stretches, and in severe cases- cast immobilization.

Osgood-Schlatter

OSGOOD-SCHLATTER is a common cause of knee pain in children ages 10 to 15. It occurs due to a period of rapid growth, combined with a high level of sporting activity.

Osgood-Schlatter sounds far more frightening than it actually is. It is a common cause of knee pain in children ages 10 to 15. It occurs due to a period of rapid growth, combined with a high level of sporting activity.

These changes result in a pulling force from the patella tendon on the tibial tuberosity (bony protrusion at the top of the shin). This area then becomes inflamed, painful and swollen. Typical presentation includes pain over the tibial tuberosity, which is worse with and after athletic activities.

The area may become visibly inflamed and even larger in size than the unaffected side. Treatments include rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medications, quadriceps stretching, bracing (knee support knee strap to decrease tension on the patellar tendon) and physical therapy.

If you are at all concerned about your child, make an appointment today.