Blog Archives

Flat feet- Children’s feet | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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Children with flat feet, also called pes planus, have a flattening of the arch during standing and walking.

Flat foot is normal in infants and young children. At this age, in the absence of any associated symptoms, treatment is highly debatable.

Flat foot usually naturally corrects itself as muscles strengthen and soft tissues stiffen. The height of the arch in the foot increases with age until about 9 years. The problem is when flat foot persists, spontaneously occurs in older children or later in life, or is associated with pain and disability.

Flat feet can be flexible or rigid, painful or painless and associated with a tightness of the calf muscles (Achilles tendon). The majority of flat feet are painless, but when pain is present it is usually during weight-bearing activities such as walking and running. The pain can be in the sole of the foot, the ankle, or non-specific pain all around the foot area.

 

What causes flat feet?

A complex and sophisticated interaction of bones, ligaments, muscles and nerves within and above the foot defines its anatomy and function. Anything that interrupts the integrity of these structures leading to a collapsed arch can cause symptomatic flat feet.

Examination of the foot begins with an examination of the entire child, because the flat foot may have an underlying cause.

Flat foot can also originate from unusual anatomy such as a tarsal coalition (bones joined together), ligament or muscle damage, restricted ankle movement, outward rotated lower legs, and knock knees (where the legs bow inwards at the knee). Obesity can result in collapse of the arches by the increased load on the foot. If knock knees also develop, the middle of the foot will tend to turn out (abduct). The foot will point outwards when walking, instead of straight ahead, which is inefficient and can cause early fatigue.

Footwear in early childhood has been thought to cause flat foot. It is likely that children who wear shoes, are not physically active and have flat feet will have decreased muscle activation in their feet and thus impaired foot function and weakness.

Some older children and adolescents develop flat feet in the absence of any disorder or associated factors.

 

Does flat foot need to be treated?

Flat feet require treatment only if clearly associated with pain or decreased function. Managing the underlying cause or disease is of highest priority; just treating the symptoms should be secondary.

If flat foot is observed in a child who is overweight and has knock knees, or in a child with excess joint flexibility and poor footwear, each of these factors could be contributing to the symptoms, and each should be addressed.

If a child’s quality of life is affected by how their feet look, feel or function, then the associated issues should be addressed.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

5 quick and easy tips to healthy feet and legs | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

one pair has to last a lifetime

There are many causes of leg pain right from muscle cramps and inflammation of tendons to arthritis, varicose veins and nerve damage. Leg pain due to muscle strain following an injury or wearing tight shoes for a long time can be prevented by following few simple tips:

  1. Stretch the leg muscle: One of the most effective ways to prevent leg pain due to a sudden muscle twist or cramp is to stretch the muscle. This not only improves blood flow to the injured muscle but it also helps in reducing muscle tension thereby relieving muscle soreness.
  2. Take a warm shower: If you suffer from leg pain, then take a warm shower to relax the muscles. If taking a bath is not feasible, then placing a heating pad on the affected areas can also help. A heat pack works best if the pain is due to a previous injury as it not only relaxes blood vessels but also improves blood circulation, alleviating leg pain.
  3. Wear a proper fitting athletic shoe: Most people fail to choose the right fitting shoe, which is one of the common causes of leg and heel pain. To get the right fit, determine the shape of your foot using the ‘wet test’. For this, step out of the shower onto a surface that will show your footprint, like a brown paper bag. If you have a flat foot, you will see an impression of your whole foot on the paper. If you have a high arch, you will only see the ball and heel of your foot. When shopping, look for athletic shoes that match your particular foot pattern.
  4. Choose the right sports shoe: Not many people are aware that different types of shoes are specially designed to meet your sports requirement. Did you know running long distances in court-style sneakers can contribute to shin splints? It is important to choose the shoes according to your sport or fitness routine.
  5. Go slow if you are a beginner at the gym: One of the common mistakes that most people commit is to overexert on the first day of the gym, which not only exerts pressure on the knee but also causes muscle soreness and leg pain. The key to preventing leg pain and sticking to your workout routine is to build your fitness level slowly. You can start off with less strenuous workouts and then gradually increase the duration, intensity, and frequency of your exercise regimen.

For any foot problems, contact The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Keep those feet happy | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

foot-care

The importance of our feet has been understood for centuries. Even the Greek philosopher Socrates is reputed to have said, “To him whose feet hurt, everything hurts.” So, what comprises foot care that promotes comfort at any age?

  • Wear shoes and socks that fit and are comfortable.
  • Be sure your toes are not cramped.
  • Change socks daily and if possible have two pairs of shoes in everyday use so that you can alternate the pairs daily.
  • Elastic laces are handy if your feet swell.

Shoes should be worn that cover, protect, provide stability for the foot and minimize the chance of falls.

Whatever your age – student or grandparent – foot care is important.

  • Remember to cut or file your nails straight across and never shorter than the end of your toe.
  • If you are older, and particularly if you are diabetic, it is helpful to get The Podiatrist to do your foot care.
  • It is best to wash feet daily and always test the water’s temperature beforehand. Pat, do not rub, your feet dry and remember to dry between and under the toes. If your feet are bothering you you’ll find that short soaks of even ten minutes are soothing.
  • Use a lanolin (ointment base) moisturizing cream for dry and cracked skin. If your feet perspire, dust lightly with talcum powder. Remember to remove excess cream of powder from between your toes to avoid skin problems. If you are diabetic it is wise to examine your feet daily.
  • Exercise each day if possible. Walking is always good but there are also special foot exercises that can be done like rolling your feet over a rolling pin several times daily or picking up a crumpled towel with your toes.

Despite reasonable care throughout life, however, the older foot is subject to problems. Heredity is a factor as are the stresses over the years and complications from systemic diseases. It has been estimated that at least 80 percent of people over 50 have at least one foot problem.

The most common are corns and calluses, ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, strained arches, heel pain and arthritis including gout.

In many cases there can be improvements jus by switching shoes to the type with wider, box-type toes. Also. shoe size can actually change with added years.

Feet carry our body’s weight, help hold us erect, co-ordinate and maintain balance in walking. We need to give them tender, loving and skilled care.

The returns are high, including the joy of a walk.

Make an appointment with The Podiatrist today.

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

 

Is Running Healthy? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

selecting the correct runinng shoes is important

The most common running injuries are due to overuse, over training, improper training shoes or a flaw in running form. The important thing is that most running injuries can be prevented.

Here are some of the most common injuries:

Runner’s knee: Runner’s knee is also called patella femoral syndrome and is a common ailment among run. This term is used to refer to a number of medical conditions that cause pain around the front of the knee.

Achilles tendinitis:   Achilles tendinitis is an injury that is the result of overuse and degeneration of the Achilles tendon. The  Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Achilles tendinitis often happens when runners suddenly increase the distance or intensity of their runs.

Plantar fasciitis: Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Plantar fascia is the band of tissue that connects your heel bone to toes. Inflammation of this tissue can be very painful resulting in stabbing pain in the heel especially in the morning.

Shin splints: Shin splints, clinically called medial tibial stress syndrome, is a common injury to runners or people who participate in activities with sudden stops and starts. Pain along the inner edge of the shinbone is an indication of shin splints.

Stress fracture: A stress fracture is an overuse injury. It occurs when muscles become fatigued and are unable to absorb added shock. Eventually, the fatigued muscle transfers the overload of stress to the bone causing a tiny crack called a stress fracture.

For all your foot problems, visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Pain in the ball of the foot- The Podiatrist | YourFeetNZ

forefoot pain

Pain at the ball of the foot, or the forefoot, is a common complaint in athletes. The forefoot is the part of the foot in front of the ankle consisting of groups of bones that include the metatarsals (five long bones in the forefoot) and phalanges (the bones that make up the toes). There are many medical issues that can arise in this region due to trauma, overuse, or other factors. Forefoot pain can range from mild pain causing a slight limp to severe pain that prevents walking. Common causes include: stress fracture, interdigital neuroma (also known as Morton neuroma), and sesamoiditis.
Stress fractures
A stress fracture is one of the more concerning potential causes of your discomfort. Metatarsal stress fractures result from repetitive stress to the forefoot, usually from running, jumping, dancing, and other repetitive weight-bearing activities. Patients with stress fractures of the metatarsal shaft describe a history of gradually worsening pain in the forefoot. Initially the pain is intermittent and occurs only with use. The patient may present with poorly defined forefoot pain or point tenderness over a metatarsal shaft. If the causative activity continues, the injury can progress, with swelling, severe pain even with normal activities, and frank fracture.
Diagnosis is made using history, physical exam, and potentially imaging studies. They usually respond well to cessation of the causative activity. Crutches and partial weight-bearing for several weeks may be helpful in patients who have pain with walking. A short-leg cast and non-weight-bearing may be used for short periods of time in patients with severe pain.
Interdigital neuroma
Interdigital neuromas are thought to be due to swelling and scar tissue formation on the small interdigital nerves. They most commonly involve the third webspace, but may also be seen in the second and fourth. Symptoms associated with a neuroma may include sharp or shooting pain, numbness, or pins and needle sensation. Many patients describe it as feeling like something is wadded up under the toes. It frequently can be temporarily relieved by removing the shoes and massaging the area.
Neuromas can be caused by trauma or chronic irritation. Chronic irritation can be in the form of wearing shoes that are not wide enough in the forefoot area causing compression of nerve. The irritation may also occur from abnormal mechanics of the foot causing excess motion of the metatarsal bones.
Diagnosis can be made by using elements of the history and physical exam, or by imaging studies such as ultrasound or MRI. Conservative treatment may include use of properly fit shoes (well cushioned with wide forefoot), metatarsal foot pads (to evenly distribute pressure to the metatarsal heads), and physical therapy (to address mechanics and strengthen the intrinsic muscles of the foot). If conservative treatment fails, injection therapy and surgery are also considerations.
Inflammation
Inflammation or injury of the sesamoid bones located on the plantar surface of the big toe joint can also cause pain in athletes. The sesamoids are pea-sized bones that function as pulleys for tendons (just as the patella does for the knee extensors) and assist with weightbearing. The athlete with sesamoiditis typically complains of pain at the area of the big toe joint with weightbearing that is exacerbated by walking, and even more so by running. Exquisite tenderness of the sesamoids is present, and is exacerbated by pushing off with the great toe. Imaging may be required to differentiate between sesamoiditis and a stress fracture. Both may require a short period of immobilization followed by prolonged rest from weightbearing activity. Athletes can use alternative, nonweightbearing forms of exercise to maintain fitness. Treatment with custom orthotics, soft pads cut to relieve pressure on the sesamoids, and in severe cases, glucocorticoid injections may be helpful. Consultation with a foot surgeon is reasonable in persistent cases.
These are just a few of the potential causes of your pain, however there are many other potential causes of forefoot pain. Discussion with The Podiatrist is advised. A specific diagnosis can then be made, after a full history and physical is performed. Appropriate treatment can also then be discussed.

See The Podiatrist for all your foot problems.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Shoes that make the grade

Children’s feet change with age. Shoe and sock sizes may change every few months as a child’s feet grow.

  • Shoes that don’t fit properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child’s feet before buying shoes, and watch for signs of irritation.
  • Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn’t mean it will fit another the same way. Also, sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete’s foot and nail fungus.
  • Examine the heels. Children may wear through the heels of shoes quicker than outgrowing shoes themselves. Uneven heel wear can indicate a foot problem that should be checked by a podiatrist.
  • Take your child shoe shopping. Every shoe fits differently. Letting a child have a say in the shoe buying process promotes healthy foot habits down the road.
  • Always buy for the larger foot. Feet are seldom precisely the same size.
  • Buy shoes that do not need a “break-in” period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. Also make sure to have your child try on shoes with socks or tights, if that’s how they’ll be worn.
  • Consider closed toe shoes. Covering the child’s toes allows for more protection.

Do Your Child’s Shoes “Make The Grade?”

  • Look for a stiff heel. Press on both sides of the heel counter. It shouldn’t collapse.
  • Check toe flexibility. The shoe should bend with your child’s toes. It shouldn’t be too stiff or bend too much in the toe box area.
  • Select a shoe with a rigid middle. Does your shoe twist? Your shoe should never twist in the middle.
  • Are the shoes secure on the foot? Laces or Velcro are best to hold the foot in place.

Additional Advice for Parents

  • Foot problems noticed at birth will not disappear by themselves. Do not wait until children get older to fix a problem. Foot problems in youths can lead to create problems down the road.
  • Get your child checked by The Podiatrist. A lack of complaint by a youngster is not a reliable sign that there is no problem. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.
  • Walking is the best of all foot exercises. Observe your child’s walking patterns. Does your child have gait abnormalities? Correct the problem before it becomes a bigger issue.
  • Going barefoot is a healthy activity for children under the right conditions. However, walking barefoot on dirty pavement can expose children’s feet to the dangers of infection through accidental cuts and to severe contusions, sprains or fractures. Plantar warts, a virus on the sole of the foot, can also be contracted.

Children’s sports-related injuries are on the rise. A child’s visit to The Podiatrist can help determine any concerns there may be regarding the child participating in specific sports and help identify the activities that may be best suited for the individual child.

Visit The Podiatrist for any concerns you may have.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

http://www.kidsnmotion.co.nz

Jandals could be bad for your feet.

Nobody loves their jandals more than us Kiwis. As the warmer weather approaches (we hope), we start digging out the jandals.

They’re so easy and breezy, such an obvious choice, especially when summer reaches its peak and the holidays are in full swing.

But the next time you reach into the closet and pull out your favorite pair, be aware: You could be opening a Pandora’s box of podiatry problems.

Your favorite sassy and affordable flats are an unstable form of footwear, known to wreak havoc on arches, heels and toes, says The Podiatrist.

It’s a disaster waiting to happen. And sure, many people make it through just fine. But the shoes are a problem.

Here are the of wearing the favourite Kiwi fashion accessory and the risks and  some tips

Tension for the toes: Wearing jandals may feel like the next-best thing to going barefoot, but your feet are working harder than you think. Jandals force a change in your walking stride. With each step, the toes pull down on the shoe to stabilize the foot against the ground. Your foot has to step forward a little quicker. It’s trying to keep the flip-flop on. The result, is toe pain and stubbed toes.

Bound for blisters: The classic jandal features two straps sprouting from between the first two toes.  Everyone dislikes how the rubbing triggers blisters. Problem is, there’s no other place for toes to hang on to the sandal.

Arch of no triumph: Spend too much time walking in jandals, and the muscles that hold up the foot’s arch start to fatigue. Arch pain comes when those muscles change the way they function just to keep you moving along. Runners, hyper-fast walkers and heavier folks will feel this more often.

Plant this: About 15 percent of all adult foot injuries involve plantar fasciitis, that awful pain that comes from the tissue stretching from your heel, through the arch to the toes. It’s impossible to ban jandals, especially in the tropical environment, so  if you’re going to the beach, wear your jandals, but don’t take your four kilometre morning walk in jandals. Don’t walk around the Malls doing Christmas shopping in jandals, and don’t go sight seeing on holiday and  walk around all day in jandals, because you’re just looking for trouble.

Fractured feet: Stress fractures, often on the top of the foot ,typically don’t come from an injury, but from normal activity. With a stress fracture, you might as well trade in your jandals  for an immobilizing foot boot.

Domino effect: One andals injury can lead to more problems, he says. You start walking differently and then your ankle hurts, your knee hurts, your back hurts. It works its way up. People with existing chronic health problems can unknowingly put themselves at risk, too. Anyone with balance problems or foot instability should not consider jandals. Those with diabetes or circulation problems should be careful, as foot punctures and extreme pressure on the balls of your foot can lead to blisters and ulcers.

Hot foot: Everyone has, at one time or another, forgotten to put sunscreen on the top of their jandaled feet. The resulting sunburn is painful enough, but those blisters can evolve into even more serious problems.

Be cautious: Jandals are not the proper footwear for yard work or backyard play. The Podiatrist  urges common sense. If you’re mowing, pulling weeds are using a shovel, pull on a sturdy pair of shoes. If you’re getting ready to play catch, touch football or horseshoes, grab your sneakers. You can slip back into your jandals when you’re done.

For all your footcare needs and advice- visit The Podiatrist

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Painful Heel and Arch

Heel and arch pain are the most common foot complaints of individuals over the age of 40. The group that most commonly experiences heel and arch pain consist of middle-aged women. In addition, active athletes and people working on hard surfaces or walking great distances are susceptible to plantar fascitis and developing heel spurs or sore arches. The pain can progressively get worse so that activities of daily living are adversely affected.

Plantar Fascia Defined

The plantar fascia connects to the calcaneus or heel bone on the undersurface of the foot to the bones of the toes. Its purpose is to support the large arch of the foot. When the fascia becomes injured or inflamed, it’s called plantar fascitis.

What Can Cause Plantar Fascitis?

Plantar fascitis begins with injury to the ligaments and fascia. The fascia helps to maintain the large arch on the inside of the foot. It may affect one or both feet. In most cases, it begins gradually and may be made worse by the following:

  • Poorly Fitting Shoes – Shoes lacking firm shanks and counters      allow the foot to override the shoe so it appears like the foot has slid      off the sole of the shoe. This is commonly called “running over the shoe”.
  • Pronation and Pes Planus – “Flat feet” is a rolling inward of the      arch.
  • Prolonged Standing on Hard Surfaces Such as      Concrete
  • Walking, Dancing or Running Great Distances – These result in repetitive strain on the      bottom of the foot.
  • Being Overweight –      Extra weight on the arches is stressful.
  • Sex –      Females over age 40 are more susceptible.

Symptoms of Plantar Fascitis

The presentation of complaints to the doctor includes heel pain upon arising first thing in the morning. The first dozen steps or so are very painful until the fascia loosens up and becomes more flexible. The pain seems to subside only to get worse as the day progresses.

Diagnosis of Plantar Fascitis

The diagnosis of plantar fascitis is arrived at from a combination of
history and physical examination of the foot and lower leg. A classic complaint is heel pain when getting out of bed and beginning to walk. Compression of the calcaneus or heel bone on the sides of the heel is painful. X-rays may be necessary if the doctor suspects a stress fracture  to one of the small bones of the foot. Many of the causes of plantar fascitis may contribute to a stress fracture in the foot.

Pain and numbness in the foot at night may also be attributed to a condition called tarsal tunnel sydrome. This is a nerve entrapment in the ankle that may produce similar symptoms as those found with plantar fascitis. Both conditions can bother at night when trying to sleep. Other conditions including arthritis, gout and other systemic problems can also contribute to foot pain.

The immediate treatment goal is to reduce the swelling and inflammation to the soft tissue in the foot. Ice treatment to the foot is initially prescribed. Wearing shoes with a firm counter and shank to prevent bowing of the shoe as well as “running over the side of the shoe” is recommended. Discontinuing running and sports activities reduces stress on the foot. The use of orthotics can be very helpful in restoring the arch (flat foot) and correcting pronation (turning in of the foot). Restoring the arch reduces the stress on the knee, hip and spine. Specific exercises will be given for the foot.

Conclusion

It’s difficult for any one treatment protocol to resolve or control plantar fascitis. The combination of proper footwear, treatment, exercise and modification of activity can be successful. Patient compliance is essential to help in the care and treatment. It may take from a few weeks to several months to resolve the problem. Re-injury and aggravation play a large role in the recovery process. The importance of compliance cannot be stressed enough.

If plantar fascitis is ignored and not treated, it may complicate or contribute to ankle, knee, hip and spinal complaints. The biomechanics of gait may be altered.

The Podiatrist has experience in the care and treatment of plantar fascitis and heel spurs. Call today to make an appointment.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Training for the Auckland Marathon? Are Your Feet Marathon Ready?

Your feet need to be in tip-top shape if you expect to run 138,336 feet to actually finish a marathon.

Being that your feet are the connection to the ground, they have to primed and steps should be taken to avoid injury that can slow you down or knock you out of the race. So whether you are training to win or simply running to run, it is important to know what foot problems can occur, and hopefully treat them before they become a marathon-breaker.

Specific Marathon Foot Issues: No matter how experienced a runner, the foot is always susceptible to running injuries, and this risk amplified during marathon training. On marathon day, however, there is specific injury risk because runners tend to me more committed to “running though” a problem (new
or old).

A method to remember marathon-related foot problems is the mnemonic “ABCD“:

Abrasions & Blisters

Bone Breaks

Cramping & Tendon Problems

Disorders of the Toenail

Provided below are explanations of marathon-related foot injuries as well as preventative measures. Should you, the reader (or runner), have any additional preventive solutions or tips for any of the running ABCD’s, please share them.

Abrasions & Blisters: Pressure points and repetitive irritation set the stage for abrasions and blisters. Common runner pressure spots are on the top of the toes, big toe joint area and the back part of the heel. Runners with bunions and hammer toes are more likely to have skin irritation. An abrasion is a simple break in the skin, whereas a blister is lifting of the skin with a fluid collection beneath it.

  • Preventive Solutions:
    Prevention is best form of treatment. Keep skin thoroughly moisturized, as dry
    skin is more prone to tearing. Callused areas should be targeted, and urea
    creams are specifically useful in breaking down excessive skin build-up.
    Callus/corn removers should be used cautiously as they contain salicylic acid
    and can excessively deteriorate tissue, leading to open sores.
  • Socks are important in the battle
    against skin irritation when running long distances. Specialty socks have
    specific protective cushioned areas dedicated to pressure spots.
  • Ill-fitting footwear is one of the
    main reason for friction, so it’s important to have sneakers that best fit your
    foot type. Also, carefully inspect the stitching at the front of the sneaker
    where the toes bend to be sure that it does not rub when fully extended. Newer
    sneakers are more likely to be problematic.

Bone Breaks: Fractures (aka bone breaks) are the most serious problem that a runner could develop. They typically start as a microscopic fracture (stress fracture) and can progress onto a through and through break. Most common are metatarsal stress fractures involving the second toe region. Heel strike runners may be more susceptible to stress fractures of the heel bone.

An acute stress fracture is often present with varying degrees of pain, swelling, and sometimes redness, though stress fractures may occur without you even knowing it. Running with a stress fracture is not medically advised, and most health care professionals would recommend calling off the race. Runners who don’t heed such advice may fully fracture through the bone which could lead to bone displacement (malalignment) — a potentially serious problem. Some people may have brittle bones making them more likely to develop a bone injury. Certain foot types seem to be more prone to stress fractures — very flat feet or very high arched feet.

  • Preventive Solutions:
    Over stressing the foot is what often leads to fractures. Pain may also be an
    indicator that you are training beyond the current capability of your foot, so
    it may be necessary to scale back. Pain should not be ignored, and any could be
    a sign of a fracture, so seeking professional medical care is recommended.
  • More cushioned sneakers do not
    necessarily offer more protection from developing an injury, and running form
    may be more important. Nonetheless, properly fitting running sneakers are
    important to help you become more in tune with your running technique.
    Depending of foot structure, orthotics may help balance the foot and take
    pressure off those spots prone to stress fractures.
  • Proper nutrition is important in
    maintaining strong bones. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, a
    precursor to bone. Calcium is needed for proper bone health and Vitamin D helps
    promote Calcium absorption. Eating a balanced meal should be a part of your
    overall health plan.

Cramping & Tendonitis: Biomechanical and structural problems within the foot tend to manifest as shin splints, arch cramping, plantar fasciitis and/or tendinitis. Less experienced runners tend to develop these problems and is commonly the result of training past the capabilities of your foot. Tight  musculature may also be at the root of cramping and shin splints. These problems tend to be self-limited and resolve with targeted treatment programs, but can set you back in terms of being marathon ready.

  • Preventive Solutions: Building
    strength and stamina slowly is the best method to avoid injury. Be sure to
    incorporate a thorough stretching program to keep muscles and tendons stretched
    and warmed up. Weak muscles within the foot can be strengthened with specific
    foot training programs. Ease cramping in the foot with post-run Epsom salt
    baths. Deep tissue massage is also a helpful measure.
  • Arch supports (orthotics) can help
    manage arch pain by providing support and perhaps better alignment of the foot
    in certain people. Of course, foot type plays a big role in selecting the
    proper amount of support. Running in the wrong-type of sneaker for your foot
    may be responsible for discomfort, so changing sneakers may be beneficial. A
    break from running may be necessary to resolve the problem. Runners with
    persistent problems should seek the advice of a health care professional.

Disorders of the Toenail: A black toenail is a problem that every marathon runner has experienced, and is the result of bleeding beneath the nail plate. Pressure and friction from repetitive running seem to be the culprit. The damaged nail can be painful and often results in the toenail falling off.
Fortunately, a black toenail doesn’t typically interfere with training and common is self-limiting.

  • Preventive Solutions:
    Prevention is difficult, as the black toenail is often the result of prolonged
    toenail irritation from the intense mileage of training. Again, properly
    fitting shoes with enough room for the toenails are helpful. Keep toenails well
    trimmed to not create a fulcrum for the nail to become lifted. It is unclear if
    moisturizing the toenails offers any protective benefit but a soft nail may,
    theoretically, be less prone to damage. Should you develop an acute painful
    black toenail, then medical attention may be needed to alleviate the active
    collection of blood. An irritated loose nail may become infected and this can
    be serious.

By the time marathon day rolls around, and if you have avoided or overcome injury during your training and your feet are pain free, then you likely have feet that are ready to start a marathon.

 

For any advice on footwear or if you have any problems, make an appointment with The Podiatrist.

Athletes are more prone to injuries, bumps and bruises than most people are.

One particular injury, known as shin splints, happens more commonly among athletes who engage in running, such as soccer players, football players and runners. Shin splints, however, are not limited to athletes of just these sports.

What are shin splints?

Shin splints is a general term but refers to many types of injuries that occur in the region of the lower leg (where the calf and shin are located). Shin splints can be caused by inflammation or injury to muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones within the lower leg. In some cases, shin splints can be caused by stress fractures in the shin bones.

What are the signs and symptoms of shin splints?

Shin splints are characterized by a great deal of pain to the lower leg, especially so in the lower portion of the shin closer to the foot. The pain usually worsens when physical activity is begun but eases as the activity continues. The pain may return once the physical activity has been discontinued but often returns later, typically the next morning, much more painful than it had been the previous day. The pain typically intensifies when the toes and foot are bent downwards. In some cases, swelling and redness can be observed in the flesh along the shin bone. Sometimes lumps can be felt beneath the skin along
the shin bone. Shin splints may make it difficult and even excruciating to walk or move.

How are shin splints treated?

There is no cure, however, there are many different treatments available that may help ease the pain associated with shin splints. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications may be taken to help reduce any swelling that may be contributing to the pain. When the pain is especially intense, icing the area may help ease the pain. Shin splints can be the result of the stress of flat feet so wearing special orthopedic footwear, such as shoes with arch support or foot orthoses, may help ease the pain associated with shin splints. Sometimes physical therapy and special range of motion exercises may help ease the pain of shin splints. Strapping the affected area also helps relieve some of the symptoms. Rocktape is a very effect strapping solution for all your sports injuries. When shin splints become especially painful, medical interventions and narcotic pain medications may become necessary. Sometimes a physician may order an X-ray to determine whether or not a stress fracture may be the cause of the pain. Crutches may be needed if the pain is bad enough.

If you feel you have ‘shin splints’ or any other foot related problems, visit The Podiatrist.