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Feet ready for summer? | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

 

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One perk of a beach-bound holiday is knowing that instead of closed in shoes with socks or stockings and having your feet feeling toasty in sweaty Uggs, you can lounge happily with your toes dangling in the warm weather, shoe-free with the sand at your feet. But alas, the dream does come with its own set of tootsie troubles. Even if you are just lying still on your back soaking up the rays, your feet are still vulnerable. You can seriously sunburn your feet and no matter how upscale your hotel, athlete’s foot can lurk in all public pool areas.

  1. Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete’s foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
  2. Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
  3. Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don’t forget to reapply after you’ve been in the water.
  4. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking water will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  5. Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.
  6. Some activities at the beach, lake, or river may require different types of footwear to be worn, so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
  7. If you injure your foot or ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from a podiatric physician. Many often only contact a doctor when something is broken or sprained, but a podiatrist can begin treating your ailment immediately while you’re away from home. Use our Find a Podiatrist tool to get treatment wherever your travels take you!
  8. In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go foot gear:
    • Flip flops—for the pool, spa, hotel room, and airport security check points
    • Sterile bandages—for covering minor cuts and scrapes
    • Antibiotic cream—to treat any skin injury
    • Emollient-enriched cream—to hydrate feet
    • Blister pads or moleskin—to protect against blisters
    • Motrin or Advil (anti-inflammatory)—to ease tired, swollen feet
    • Toenail clippers—to keep toenails trimmed
    • Emery board—to smooth rough edges or broken nails
    • Pumice stone—to soften callused skin
    • Sunscreen—to protect against the scorching sun
    • Aloe vera or Silvadene cream—to relieve sunburns

 

We have an extensive range of foot creams to help with those dry and cracked heels. Come and have a look.

For all your foot care needs- see The Podiatrist

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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Help your feet in 2016 | The Podiatrist and your feetnz

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We all start out with a clean slate on New Year’s Eve. It’s a time when most of us make a resolution to stop doing something that is making us unhealthy or unhappy; and to go in another direction for something new that will make us improve our quality of life. Time is not slowing down and it is taking a toll on our feet.

I encourage all of you to pay more attention to your feet this New Year and to take action for improvement. Here are some health tips that will help your feet feel younger and beautiful in 2016!

 

Tip 1: Wear Proper Footwear and be Size Smart!

Choose proper footwear for all occasions this year and be size smart. Pitch the old trainers that have been lying around in your closet. Ask The Podiatrist for some tips to select a shoe that is designed for the fitness activity and for your foot type.

Whenever possible, leave the stilettos in your closet. At least try to wear them less or scale down the heel height. Try to wear them on alternate days or slip into a pair of foot friendly flats when you get to work. There is nothing beautiful about painful feet and shoe wear that may lead to ankle sprains, bunions, hammertoes, plantar fasciitis, ingrown toenails, neuromas, and surgery.

Properly fitted shoes will help prevent corns, calluses, blisters, chafing, and foot or ankle injuries. Make a healthier choice of shoes this year. Foot-friendly shoes will help your feet; and your body will appreciate this.

 

Tip 2: Don’t Ignore Heel Pain!

The heel bone (calcaneus) is the largest bone in the foot that is subjected to the weight bearing load when walking. Heel pain is not something to ignore. It’s a signal that there is something that needs to be checked by your podiatrist.

Although the most common form of heel pain is plantar heel pain. It may be caused by arthritis, a stress fracture, a heel spur, an irritation of the nerves, or problems in the arch. Once The Podiatrist diagnoses the cause, the proper treatment can be selected.

In most cases, heel pain may be resolved with conservative treatment like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, different footwear that provides better support, stretching exercises, cold therapy, and rest. Other treatments may include corticosteroid injections, orthotic devices, removable walking casts, night splints, padding and strapping, and physical therapy.
Tip 3: Stop Bunion Discomfort and Pain!

If you are experiencing severe pain and discomfort because of a bunion that is interfering with your daily activities, it’s time to explore your surgical options. If your anxiety has caused you to avoid surgery, you may be doing yourself more harm than good. An altered gait (walking) pattern can contribute to other mechanical problems in your feet and put unwanted stress on your ankles, knees, hips, and spine.

 

Tip 4: Support your Feet with Custom Orthotics!

Custom orthotics are made from cast impressions of your feet and inserted into your shoes. Orthotics are designed to properly provide support for your arches and to distribute your weight bearing loads more uniformly. They are especially helpful for people with foot deformities, athletes, pregnant moms, and seniors who are experiencing greater changes in their feet.

A wide range of orthotics is available for various activities and shoe types, and for children and adults. Orthotics are not a permanent correction for a mechanical foot deformity but it can help slow down the progression of a deformity and need for surgery. New orthotics are generally needed every two years and should be checked for wear and tear.

 

Tip 5: Start Moving but Start Smart!

Physical activity contributes to your health and can provide benefits to your feet. Select activities that you enjoy and get your feet moving. Don’t rush into fitness. Start smart to avoid injuries like shin splints and plantar fasciitis (heel pain). A steady, gradual program is more beneficial in the long run than an intense program that puts undue stress on your feet. Avoid running on uneven surfaces and terrain; and incorporate cross training into your fitness program to reduce the stress on your feet.

Exercising your feet and ankles is also important to keep them strong and flexible. Talk with your podiatrist about easy exercises that can be done in your home. Strong feet will also have a positive effect on reducing pain in your back, hips, and knees.

 

Tip 6: Say Goodbye to Ugly Toenails!

If you are tired of having to deal with the embarrassment of toenail irregularities cause by fungus, we have some solutions for you.

 

Your feet deserve the very best in 2016! If you are interested in seeking help, call The Podiatrists.

We also have a huge range of foot care products- only the best for your feet.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

A Holiday Survival Guide For Strappy Sandals Lovers- Foot care solutions to get you through the season in style

Dr Scholls toe protectors are great to wear

It has been reported that 87% of women have foot problems from wearing painfully ill-fitting shoes, it is time for some serious thinking about foot care and what can you do to preserve those tender tootsies while still partying like its 1999 in strappy sandals this holiday season.

Foot care is extremely important, and it often gets forgotten. Going to the salon to get a pedicure isn’t enough—regular maintenance is key, and should be part of your routine. Keep foot care products such as the Gehwol Creams and a pumice in the shower year-round so that it’s not a huge undertaking. Spend 30 seconds on each foot at least twice a week.

This is a program to help relax the foot muscles, prevent ugly blisters, and lessen the likelihood of bunions.
For starters, a good ‘ole foot soak with Gehwol Herbal Bath Salts relieves weary foot pain and swelling, and moisturizes as you soak the feet. Peppermint is often regarded as ‘the world’s oldest medicine, known for its relaxing, cooling effects on the body and mind. The Gehwol Mint cream is ideal for aching feet.

For daytime moisturizing, I use the Gehwol Blue or Green, or even the Balm creams. To prevent blisters, corns and burning pains over the balls of your feet, try some Dr Scholl’s toe protectors, or Foot Angel pads.

For an overnight emollient, you need a slightly thicker, lusher cream. The Gewhol Hydrolipid or Cracked Skin Salve.
Within days of caring for your feet, you will be strutting around with no pains at all.

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For any problems, see The Podiatrist- for all your foot care needs.
http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Heading off for a break from the cold? Some tips to keep your feet healthy

For many of you who are heading away for the school holidays for some warmth, the thought if warmer weather is an  invitation to declare freedom for your feet.

That means out with bulky shoes and in with less-supportive flip-flops,  sandals and clogs. Those people may be left feeling more footloose and fancy  free, but they also may pay the price later.

Podiatrists have been warning patients for years about  the harm they were doing to their feet and lower legs by wearing flimsy  footwear. Warnings that were once based on anecdotes, though, now have more  scientific evidence to support them.

At least one key researcher’s interest in studying the effects of wearing  flip-flops and similar footwear was fueled by their growing popularity on  college campuses.

“They’re not made to walk around in all day,” said Justin Shroyer, who was  working on his graduate degree at Auburn University at the time. “They’re for  wearing to the beach so you don’t have to walk on the hot blazing pavement  between your car and the sand.”

Flip-flops significantly shortened their stride and how long their feet were  in contact with the ground compared with sneakers. Further, flip-flops tended to  reduce how much the top part of the swinging foot flicks up toward the shin.

Shroyer speculates that the shorter steps and lessened foot motion are  consequences of the wearers’ efforts to keep the flip-flops on their feet as  they walk. People tend to grip the base with their toes to keep their flip-flops  from flip-flopping off. That downward exertion, however, conflicts with the  foot’s propensity to rise at the front to shift the ground strike to the  heel.

Shroyer thinks that tug-of-war puts extra pressure on the tibial anterior,  the muscle at the front of the shin, and leads to the soreness that some  attribute to long-term flip-flop wear

“If you had a normal workout in the winter and then went into the gym and  worked overtime on the muscle, you’re going to be sore,” said Shroyer, who  published the study in a 2010 edition of the Journal of the American Podiatric  Medical Association.

Another problem is that flip-flops, sandals and their ilk offer little shock  absorption. And many people continue to wear their flip-flops after  the padding  has been squashed.

Flat footwear can lead to foot fractures from  repeated stress on the arch of the foot.

There’s at least one  benefit of flip-flops: They help shield your feet from  burning sand and pavement and from other hazards, such as germs on a shower  floor, she said. She suggests choosing a flip-flop that bends only in the front,  has lots of cushioning in the arch and isn’t so high that they pose a risk of  slipping out of them to the side.

Summer holiday footwear tips

– Wear comfortable shoes to the airport. You never know how long you will  wait in line, how far you will walk to the terminal, or if you will have to make  a mad dash to make a connecting flight. Loose-fitting flip-flops and sandals  increase your risk of tripping, falling and spraining your ankle.

– Avoid taking new shoes on vacation. They can be stiff and unforgiving. If  you plan to dance the night away or do a lot of walking, wear shoes that will  make your feet as happy as you are.

– Take flip-flops or sandals, particularly to avoid walking barefoot in  locker rooms and around pools, where you may pick up athlete’s foot, a plantar  wart infection or toenail fungus.

– Pack an antifungal cream or powder. If you’re staying in a hotel or using  public pools, using an antifungal product can help prevent athlete’s foot.

– If you are traveling more than two hours, be sure to stretch your legs and  pump your feet. This will help circulate the blood to prevent deep vein  thrombosis or dangerous blood clots in the legs.

– Pack a small first-aid kit. Chances are you’ll develop a blister from that  long walk through the shopping village or scrape your foot on a piece of coral  at the beach. Clean your feet with saline (eye solution), apply a small amount  of antibiotic cream and cover with a Band-Aid or gauze.