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Travelling? Care for your feet. | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

Great tips on how to keep your feet healthy

Although rest and relaxation are the goals for most holidays, they usually involve a lot of walking and a lot of walking usually involves sore feet.

If your feet aren’t in the best shape or you don’t have the right shoes, too much walking can cause foot problems.

Some simple foot care tips include:

  • Wear thick, absorbent socks (acrylic instead of cotton).
  • Wear jandals/flip flops when showering to avoid the possibility of getting Tinea and dry feet thoroughly after bathing, making sure to dry between toes. The use of an antifungal powder before putting on shoes can help.
  • Nails should be cut regularly, straight across the toe.
  • Take a pair of good supportive sandals to wear to allow your feet to get some fresh air
  • The right shoe is also important to healthy walking. The ideal walking shoe should be stable from side to side, and well-cushioned, and it should enable you to walk smoothly. Running shoes are ideal.

Walking shoes tend to be slightly less cushioned, yet not as bulky, and lighter than running shoes. Whether a walking or running shoe, the shoes need to feel stable and comfortable.

Warming up exercises to help alleviate any muscle stiffness or pulled muscles are also advised before walking. Loosening up the heel cords (Achilles and calf) and thigh muscles before a walk is especially effective.

To prepare yourself for your travels if you’re not accustomed to long walks, start slowly and rest if your feet start hurting.

For any foot care problems and needs- visit The Podiatrist.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

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Feet welcome multitude of fungi | The Podiatrist and yourfeetnz

Fungal-nail-infection_r7_onychomycosis

A genetic analysis of fungi on the human body finds that our feet have the most – more than 100 types, many of which ward off the unhealthy fungi that cause infections like athlete’s foot.

At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person’s heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body.

It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose. One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin where they can cause athlete’s foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections. There is something about toenails that fungi just love.

Our feet are like a bustling fungi hotel, with different types moving in and out at a fast clip. For starters, while skin temperature on our core remains a pretty stable, the temperature of our feet fluctuates wildly. Cold feet may be hospitable to some strains of fungi, while hot feet may be more attractive to others.

Since they’re so close to the ground, our feet are probably also exposed to more fungal diversity than other parts of our body.
And there’s one more thing: People are fastidious about washing everything off their hands, but people don’t really specifically wash their feet. For many people, standing in the shower seems good enough.

Fungal foot diseases are often treated with antifungal medications that attack all fungi indiscriminately, both good and bad.

Really, wear flip-flops in the gym locker room and around Public swimming pools.

Please contact The Podiatrist for any foot care advice.

http://www.thepodiatrist.co.nz

Symptoms of Athlete’s foot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athlete’s foot or Tinea pedis is caused by a fungal infection between the toes and over the foot. The commonest symptoms are itching, burning, stinging, flaking, scaling, blistering and bleeding skin between the toes or the sides of the feet.

Symptoms of the condition

  • Red and itchy skin between toes and sides of the feet.
  • Burning, and stinging of the skin
  • Peeling, flaking and scaling of the affected skin
  • Blistering that may ooze secretions or bleed. The lesions may appear crusty or weeping.
  • Secondary bacterial infections may occur at the raw infected sites. This complicates the infection with pain, swelling, bleeding, oozing or formation of pus.
  • Thick, discoloured and easily breakable toe nails. This is called onychomycosis
  • Associated fungal infections may occur. These include ringworm on any part of the skin or jock’s itch over the groin.
  • Sometimes athlete’s foot can be spread to the hands. This condition is called tinea manuum. It occurs when a sufferer of Athlete’s foot does not wash his or her hands after touching the infected skin on their feet.

 

Types of Athlete’s foot

Types of Tinea pedis infections include toe web infections, moccasin-type infections and so forth.

Toe web infections

Toe web infections commonly affect the webs between the two smallest toes. The skin turns pale, moist and soft initially.

There may be pain, burning or stinging with itching and a slight smell.

As the infection worsens there may be secondary bacterial infection. This may lead to foul smell, pain, pus formation, blistering, oozing and bleeding.

Moccasin-type infection

Moccasin-type infection is a long term infection. It starts as a small area of dryness, burning, or itching skin. Slowly the area is thickened, with scaling, flaking and peeling skin. This may affect toe nails as well.

Vesicular infection

Vesicular infection is the least common type of athlete’s foot. It begins as blisters usually over the instep of the foot or in the toe webs.

It may progress to a full-fledged infection often affecting other areas. There may be a risk of secondary bacterial infections as well.

 

See The Podiatrist for all your foot problems

www.thepodiatrist.co.nz